Syllabus 182 Politics and Economic Policy 2010

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Unformatted text preview: Syllabus
‐
POSC
182
 Politics
and
Economic
Policy
 Professor
Yuhki
Tajima
 Winter
Quarter
2010
 Time:
M,
W,
F:
1:40‐2:30pm
 Place:
University
Village
9
 Office
Hours:
W
10:00‐12:00am
 Office:
Watkins
Hall
2231
 Email:
yuhki.tajima@ucr.edu
 
 DISCUSSION
SECTIONS
 Chris
Haynes
(chrishaynes77@gmail.com)

 Crystal
Lee
(crystal.lee002@email.ucr.edu)

 Cristina
Waggonner
(cnico001@student.ucr.edu)

 
 COURSE
OBJECTIVES
 Economic
policy
rarely
adopts
the
solutions
that
economists
believe
maximize
welfare.

To
 understand
why,
we
must
recall
that
policymakers
are
constrained
and
motivated
by
political
 factors.

Our
objective
is
to
make
sense
of
why
policymakers
adopt
the
economic
policies
they
 do.

This
course
will
examine
the
politics
of
economic
policymaking
from
an
international
 perspective.

We
will
begin
by
laying
out
basic
concepts
in
economic
theory
as
a
starting
point
 for
what
form
economists
believe
economic
policy
should
take.

We
will
then
lay
out
key
 conceptual
frameworks
for
understanding
political
behavior
so
we
can
put
ourselves
in
the
 shoes
of
policymakers.

Using
this
framework,
we
will
consider
policymaking
under
different
 regime
types
(authoritarian
vs.
democratic),
economic
contexts
(resource
rich
vs.
high
levels
of
 human
capital),
demographic
contexts
(diverse
vs.
homogeneous).

Throughout
the
course,
we
 will
attempt
to
make
sense
of
current
events
using
concepts
introduced
in
the
course.
 
 TEXT
 Cohen,
Jeffrey.

2000.

Politics
and
Economic
Policy
in
the
United
States.

Boston:
Houghton
 Mifflin.


 AJR
‐
Acemoglu,
Daron,
Simon
Johnson,
and
James
Robinson.

2005.

“Institutions
as
a
 Fundamental
Cause
of
Long‐Run
Growth”

in
Aghion,
Philippe
and
Steven
Durlauf.

Handbook
of
 Economic
Growth,
Vol.
1A.

Can
be
downloaded
at
the
following
site:
 http://www.people.fas.harvard.edu/~jrobins/researchpapers/publishedpapers/jr_institutionsc ause.pdf
 Where
possible,
I
have
included
the
web
link
for
assigned
readings
in
this
syllabus.

We
will
also
 post
readings
on
the
course
website
on
iLearn
/
Blackboard:
 http://ilearn.ucr.edu/webapps/login/ilearn/blackboard
 
 GRADING
 Mid‐term
(February
1
in
class):
25%
 Policy
Paper
(March
1
in
class):
25%
 Final
(March
16
from
3:00
to
6:00pm):
35%
 Participation:
15%
(Determined
by
Section
Leader)
 Mid‐term
and
final
exams
will
cover
all
reading
materials
(which
require
extra
reading
and
 individual
study)
as
well
as
lecture
materials.

The
final
exam
will
be
cumulative,
including
 material
covered
before
the
midterm
exam.


 All
grades
are
determined
by
the
section
leaders.

All
inquiries
regarding
grade
reviews
should
 be
directed
to
section
leaders.


 POLICIES
 1. Respect
for
others
is
the
key
to
a
good
learning
environment.

Please
be
respectful
of
 each
other
during
lectures
and
in
sections.


 2. If
you
turn
in
the
policy
paper
late,
your
grade
will
be
deducted
by
a
full
letter
grade
for
 everyday
it
is
late
(e.g.
an
A
paper
would
be
marked
down
to
a
B
if
it
is
turned
in
on
 March
2).

No
makeup
exams
will
be
given
unless
for
a
legitimate
medical
or
family
 reason.

You
must
notify
the
TA
and
CC
me
to
the
email
at
least
one
week
ahead
of
time.


 3. Cheating
and
plagiarizing
will
result
in
an
F
for
the
course.

We
will
follow
university
 procedures
for
adjudicating
each
such
case
should
they
arise.

Cite
all
work
 appropriately.
 4. If
you
have
questions
about
logistics
about
the
course,
first
refer
to
the
syllabus,
then
 the
course
page
discussion
board,
then
the
TAs.

If
you
ask
questions
on
the
discussion
 board,
others
with
the
same
question
can
benefit
from
the
same
answer.

The
TAs
will
 maintain
the
discussion
boards
regularly.

This
will
save
you
and
the
TAs
time
and
effort.

 Substantive
questions
(i.e.
those
about
the
substance
of
the
course)
will
also
be
 addressed
on
the
discussion
board,
but
can
be
addressed
to
either
the
TAs
or
me.

I
 encourage
you
to
come
to
my
office
hours
to
discuss
any
substantive
issues
that
you
 may
have.


 5. Individual
grades
will
be
exclusively
handled
by
the
TAs.

If
you
believe
there
was
a
 mistake
in
the
grading,
submit
a
petition
by
email
to
the
TA.

They
will
then
review
the
 grade
themselves.

If
there
are
systematic
problems
with
the
grading,
I
will
discuss
with
 the
TAs
 POLICY
PAPER
 You
will
have
two
options
for
the
policy
paper:
a
domestic
policy
paper
or
an
international
 policy
paper.

For
the
domestic
paper
option,
you
will
analyze
a
particular
economic
problem
 during
this
crisis
and
explain
why
a
particular
policy
was
adopted
as
opposed
to
the
other
 alternative
policies
available.

Then,
you
will
provide
advice
for
the
policymakers
on
how
they
 could
have
improved
the
adoption
of
the
policy.

For
the
international
paper
option,
you
will
 choose
a
developing
country.

You
will
defend
or
critique
a
particular
policy
of
a
given
country
 and
explain
what
you
would
do
differently.

I
will
provide
more
information
later
on
the
 specifics
of
the
paper.


 The
paper
should
be
written
based
on
the
readings
and
other
supplemental
readings.

It
should
 be
6
to
8
pages,
typed,
double‐spaced
with
1
inch
margins.

Due
March
1
in
class.


 NEWS
SOURCES
 I
encourage
you
to
keep
abreast
of
current
debates
over
economic
policy.

The
following
 sources
are
excellent
news
resources
 www.economist.com
 www.nytimes.com
 www.washingtonpost.com
 www.ft.com
 www.wsj.com
 
 I
also
encourage
you
to
monitor
blogs
of
various
economists:
 Paul
Krugman:
http://krugman.blogs.nytimes.com/
 Dani
Rodrik:
http://rodrik.typepad.com/
 Greg
Mankiw:
http://gregmankiw.blogspot.com/
 Brad
Delong:
http://delong.typepad.com/
 
 UNIT
1:
INSTITUTIONS
 Meeting
1
(January
4):
Efficiency
and
Equality
 Cohen,
pp.
1‐8
 Meeting
2
(January
6):
A
Framework
for
Political
Economics
 AJR,
pp.
386‐396
 Meeting
3
(January
8):
A
Framework
for
Political
Economics
 AJR,
pp.
396‐407
 Meeting
4
(January
11):
Underlying
Causes
of
Growth
 Sachs,
Jeffrey
and
Andrew
Warner.

“Economic
Convergence
and
Economic
Policies.”

Mimeo
 1995.

http://www.case.com.pl/upload/publikacja_plik/3414736_035.pdf
 Meeting
5
(January
13):
Underlying
Causes
of
Growth
 Sachs,
Jeffrey,
Andrew
Mellinger
and
John
Gallup.

“The
Geography
of
Poverty
and
Wealth”


 http://www.surmang.org/pdf/pah2.pdf
 Meeting
6
(January
15):
Institutions
and
Economic
Growth
 AJR
,
pp.
407‐421
 Meeting
7
(January
20):
The
Origins
of
Economic
Institutions

 AJR,
pp.
421‐428
 Meeting
8
(January
22):
The
Origins
of
Economic
Institutions

 AJR,
pp.
428‐439
 Meeting
9
(January
25):
The
Origins
of
Political
Institutions

 AJR,
pp.
439‐448
 Meeting
10
(January
27):
The
Origins
of
Political
Institutions
 AJR,
pp.
448‐464
 Meeting
11:
(January
29):
Overview
of
Analytical
Framework
 ***Meeting
12:
February
1
In‐Class
Midterm***
 UNIT
2:
POLITICAL
REGIMES
AND
ECONOMIC
SYSTEMS

 Meeting
13
(February
3):

Economic
Regimes
 Cohen,
pp.
9‐26
 Meeting
14
(February
5):
Political
Regimes:
Democracy
vs.
Authoritarianism
 Zakaria,
Fareed.

“Culture
is
Destiny:
A
Conversation
with
Lee
Kuan
Yew”

Foreign
Affairs.

 Mar/Apr

1994.


 Meeting
15
(February
8):
Political
Regimes:
Democracy
vs.
Authoritarianism
 Sen,
Amartya.

1999.

Development
as
Freedom.

New
York:
Alfred
Knopf.

Ch.
6
&
7

 Meeting
16
(February
10):
Political
Regimes:
Democracy
vs.
Authoritarianism
(continued)
 Keech,
William
R.

1995.

“Macroeconomic
Politics
and
the
Costs
of
Democracy,”
in
Economic
 Politics:
The
Costs
of
Democracy.

New
York:
Cambridge
University
Press,
Ch
1.
 UNIT
3:
POLICY
TOOLS
AND
DIVERGENT
ECONOMIC
PHILOSOPHIES
 Meeting
17
(February
12):
Political
Economic
Cycles
 Cohen,
pp.
30‐60
 Meeting
18
(February
17):
Economic
Philosophies
 Keech

“Macroeconomic
Theories
and
Their
Political
Implications”,
pp.
22‐46
 Meeting
19
(February
19):
Economic
Philosophies
 Cohen,
Ch.
7
 Meeting
20
(February
22):
Macroeconomic
Policy

 Cohen,
Ch.
8,
9
 Meeting
21
(February
24):
Regulation
 Cohen,
Ch.
10
 Meeting
22
(February
26):
Regulation
 Cohen,
Ch.
11,
12
 UNIT
4:
CURRENT
ISSUES
 Meeting
23
(March
1):

 ***Policy
Paper
Due
in
Class***
 [Readings
to
be
decided]
 Meeting
24
(March
3):
 [Readings
to
be
decided]
 UNIT
5:
INTERNATIONAL
ECONOMIC
POLICY
MAKING
 Meeting
25
(March
5):
Globalization
 Cohen,
Ch.
13
 Friedman,
Thomas.

1999.

“DOScapital”

Foreign
Policy.


No.
116.


 Waltz,
Kenneth.

1999.

“Globalization
and
Governance.”

PS:
Political
Science
and
Politics,
32
 (4):
693‐700.

[Online]
 
 Meeting
26
(March
8):
Trade
 Perkins,
Dwight,
Steven
Radelet,
Donald
Snodgrass,
Malcom
Gillis,
and
Michael
Roemer.

2001

 Economics
of
Development.

Fifth
Edition.

New
York:
W.
W.
Norton
Co.,
pp.
408‐419.
 Williamson,
John.

2004.

“A
Short
History
of
the
Washington
Consensus”

Mimeo.
 http://www.iie.com/publications/papers/williamson0904‐2.pdf
 Rodrik,
Dani.

2001.

“The
Global
Governance
of
Trade:
As
if
Development
Matters”

UNDP
 http://ksghome.harvard.edu/~drodrik/UNDPtrade.PDF
 
 Meeting
27
(March
10):
Industrial
Policy
 Rodrik,
Dani.

“Goodbye
Washington
Consensus,
Hello
Washington
Confusion?”
 http://ksghome.harvard.edu/~drodrik/Lessons%20of%20the%201990s%20review%20_JEL_.pdf
 Rodrik,
Dani.

2007.

“Normalizing
Industrial
Policy”

Mimeo.
 http://ksghome.harvard.edu/~drodrik/Industrial%20Policy%20_Growth%20Commission_.pdf
 
 Meeting
28
(March
12):
Review
 ...
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