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u06-SAMPLING THE WORLD

u06-SAMPLING THE WORLD - UNIT 6 SAMPLING THE WORLD...

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Sheet1 Page 1 UNIT 6 - SAMPLING THE WORLD <toc.html#UNIT6> UNIT 6 - SAMPLING THE WORLD Compiled with assistance from Charles Parson, Bemidji State University and Timothy Nyerges, University of Washington ------------------------------------------------------------------------ For Information that Supplements the Contents of this Unit: Errors in Maps <http://weber.u.washington.edu/~chrisman/G460/Lec22.html> (Chrisman/U of Washington) -- US data quality standards. Error, Accuracy and Precision <http://www.utexas.edu/depts/grg/gcraft/notes/error/error.html> (Geographer's Craft) -- (A few graphics) of inaccuracy and imprecision cascading undocumented data Measurement Basics <http://weber.u.washington.edu/~chrisman/G460/Lec03.html> (Chrisman/U of Washington) -- Graphics and description for: levels of measurement (nominal, ordinal, interval, ratio) measurement (absolute, counts, cyclical, multi-dimensional). Managing Error <http://www.utexas.edu/depts/grg/gcraft/notes/manerror/manerror.html> (Foote and Huebner/Geographer's Craft) -- Managing problems of error, accuracy and precision products (establishing criteria, training and testing) measuring and testing influences solutions ------------------------------------------------------------------------ * A. INTRODUCTION <#SEC6.1> * B. REPRESENTING REALITY <#SEC6.2> o Continuous variation <#SEC6.2.1> * C. SPATIAL DATA <#SEC6.3> o Location <#SEC6.3.1>
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Sheet1 Page 2 o Attributes <#SEC6.3.2> o Time <#SEC6.3.3> * D. SAMPLING REALITY <#SEC6.4> o Scales of measurement <#SEC6.4.1> o 1. Nominal <#SEC6.4.2> o 2. Ordinal <#SEC6.4.3> o 3. Interval <#SEC6.4.4> o 4. Ratio <#SEC6.4.5> o Multiple representations <#SEC6.4.6> * E. DATA SOURCES <#SEC6.5> o Primary data collection <#SEC6.5.1> o Secondary data sources <#SEC6.5.2> * F. STANDARDS <#SEC6.6> o Sharing data <#SEC6.6.1> o Agency standards <#SEC6.6.2> * G. ERRORS AND ACCURACY <#SEC6.7> o Original Sin - errors in sources <#SEC6.7.1> o Boundaries <#SEC6.7.2> o Classification errors <#SEC6.7.3> o Data capture errors <#SEC6.7.4> o Accuracy standards <#SEC6.7.5> * REFERENCES <#SEC6.8> * EXAM AND DISCUSSION QUESTIONS <#SEC6.9> * NOTES <#SEC6.10> This unit begins the section on data acquisition by looking at how the infinite complexity of the real world can be discretized and sampled. UNIT 6 - SAMPLING THE WORLD
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Sheet1 Page 3 Compiled with assistance from Charles Parson, Bemidji State University and Timothy Nyerges, University of Washington A. INTRODUCTION <#OUT6.1> * the world is infinitely complex * the contents of a spatial database represent a particular view of the world * the user sees the real world through the medium of the database o the measurements and samples contained in the database must present as complete and accurate a view of the world as possible o the contents of the database must be relevant in terms of: + themes and characteristics captured + the time period covered + the study area * this unit looks at techniques for sampling the world, and associated issues of accuracy, standards B. REPRESENTING REALITY <#OUT6.2> * a database consists of digital representations of discrete objects * the features shown on a map, e.g. lakes, benchmarks, contours can be thought of as discrete objects o thus the contents of a map can be captured in a database by turning map features into database objects * many of the features shown on a map are fictitious and do not exist in the real world o contours do not really exist, but houses and lakes are real objects
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