English A Prayer for Owen Meany Close Reading

English A Prayer for Owen Meany Close Reading - The Two...

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The Two Sides of Death
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Robert Wu English 10 H - GL 2/23/09 Period 8 Francesco Petrarch once said, “A good death does honor to the entire life.” In A Prayer for Owen Meany , a novel by John Irving that recounts the life of Johnny Wheelwright, death serves as a common motif throughout the novel in order to prove this statement. Through symbolism, imagery, and irony, Irving proves that death is a double-sided event that brings people closer together to honor one’s life. Irving uses dismal imagery and symbols in order to establish a sorrowful mood surrounding the burial of Sagamore. At the beginning of the passage, Irving describes Sagamore’s burial stating that, “the sun was clouded over, the vividness seemed muted in the maple trees, and the wind that stirred the dead leaves about the lawn had grown cold,” which invokes a gloomy and sullen mood for readers. A secondary meaning of “clouded” is to show sadness, anxiety, or anger, whereas the “sun” represents happiness and brilliance. Since the clouds replaces the sun, sadness, anxiety, and anger replaces happiness and brilliance on Front Street after Sagamore dies. Irving also makes subtle references to the
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This note was uploaded on 10/05/2010 for the course BIO 101 taught by Professor Salazar during the Spring '10 term at Punjab Engineering College.

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English A Prayer for Owen Meany Close Reading - The Two...

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