History Chapter 7 Outline

History Chapter 7 Outline - Chapter 7 Outline I. The Deep...

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Unformatted text preview: Chapter 7 Outline I. The Deep Roots of Revolution a. America was a revolutionary force due to its new ideas about society, citizen, and government. i. Republicanism is a government in which the stability of society and authority of government depends on citizens subordinating their private, selfish interests to the common good 1. Republicanism in the colonies was modeled after Greek and Roman republics 2. Republicanism was opposed to aristocracy and monarchy ii. Whigs were political commentators who feared and warned the colonies about the threat to liberty posed by the arbitrary power of the monarch and his ministers b. The circumstances of colonial life had done much to bolster these attitudes i. Dukes and princes, barons and bishops were unknown in the colonies, while property ownership and political participation were relative accessible ii. Distance weakens authority I I. Mercantilism and Colonial Grievances a. Mercantilists believed wealth was power and that a countrys economic wealth could be measured by the amount of gold or silver in its treasury i. A country had to export more than it imported to amass gold or silver. Colonies supplied raw materials to their mother country and provided a guaranteed market for exports ii. The London government looked on the American colonist as tenants since they were expected to furnish products needed in England and refrain from making certain products but rather purpose imported manufactured goods b. Parliament passed laws to regulate the mercantilist system i. The Navigation Law of 1650, aimed at rival Dutch shippers, stated that all commerce flowing to and from the colonies could only be transported in British vessels ii. Subsequent laws required that European goods destined for America first had to land in Britain, where tariffs could be collected and British middlemen could take a slice of the profits iii. Other laws stated that American shippers must ship certain enumerated products, especially tobacco, to Britain c. British policy resulted in a shortage of currency in the colonies i. Each year, gold and silver mostly from illicit trade with the Spanish and French West Indies drained from the colonies to England because the colonist bought more than they sold ii. The colonists issued paper money to resolve the currency issue by British merchant and creditors compelled Parliament to prohibit colonial legislatures from printing paper currency iii. The British crown also reserved the right to nullify any legislation passed by the colonial assemblies if such laws worked mischief with the mercantilist system I I I.Merits and Menace of Mercantilism a. Until 1763, the Navigation Laws Acts imposed no intolerable burden b/c they were loosen enforced and could easily be evaded with smuggling b. American also reaped direct benefits from the mercantile system i. London paid liberal bounties to colonial producers of ship parts and Virginia tobacco planters enjoyed a monopoly in the British market ii.ii....
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History Chapter 7 Outline - Chapter 7 Outline I. The Deep...

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