Lecture 2- Morphology - Lecture2Morphology:the...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–14. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
JULY 8 TH , 2010 Lecture 2- Morphology: the  structure of words  1
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Resuming from the previous lecture: language is  creative : humans have the ability to  produce and understand an infinite range of  sentences and words never heard before another fundamental property is  discreteness:  out of  a finite inventory of words, an infinite number of  sentences can be constructed 2
Background image of page 2
Resuming from previous lectures: in our  mental lexicon  we store sounds from which  we create words sounds and words, as well as other signs, are  forms  to which meanings are attached the relation  form-meaning   is  arbitrary  (Saussure  1916); it is not  iconic  (based on intrinsic properties) 3
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
An important question   are all sounds and words we store in our  mental  lexicon  the same?  this lecture is dedicated to the analysis of the  structure (constituency) of words, the part of  linguistics known under the name of  morphology .   4
Background image of page 4
Morphology   from Greek  morphos  (‘form’) and  logos  (‘science’)  In linguistics: the study of the structure of words and  the component of grammar that includes the rules of  word formation. 5
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Types of words Not all words we use are the same. The major  distinction is between: content words   function words   6
Background image of page 6
Content words   denote concepts also called  open classes : we can and regularly do  add new words to these classes nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs  7
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Function words   conjunctions ( and, or, but ), prepositions ( at, in, of ),  articles ( the, a/an ), pronouns ( it, he they have a grammatical function (they connect the  content words to the larger      grammatical context) do not have clear lexical meanings or obvious  concepts associated with them  8
Background image of page 8
Function words closed class:   it is very difficult (if not impossible) to  add new words to any of   the function word   categories  9
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Content words and function words Are there any other kinds of evidence supporting this  distinction?  YES psychological and neurological evidence: some brain- damaged patients have greater difficulty in using,  understanding, or reading function words than they  do with content words 10
Background image of page 10
Content words and function words they function differently in slips of the tongue  produced by normal patients  (the switching or exchanging of the function words  has not been extensively observed) 11
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Content words and function words evidence from language acquisition: in the early  stages of development children omit function words 12
Background image of page 12
Content words and function words second language learners tend to omit function  words, also; or they have more difficulties with  function words 13
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 14
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 10/05/2010 for the course LIN 200 taught by Professor Nagy during the Summer '08 term at University of Toronto- Toronto.

Page1 / 75

Lecture 2- Morphology - Lecture2Morphology:the...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 14. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online