kmp paper on entertainment industry

kmp paper on entertainment industry - COVER STORY Art...

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24 MARSHALL MAGAZINE SPRING 2004 T he creative industries (cinema, television, music, games, fashion and performing arts among others) have always fascinated me. As an avid consumer of popular culture I have developed a particularly strong appreciation for movies and music. Recently, however, after years of studying manufacturing, I decided to broaden my research and teaching interests by investigating the busi- ness side of the creative industries. My interest was fueled further by the intrigue and excitement of living in the epi- center of the entertainment industry. As I began to read the literature, it was evident that much more had been written in the business and popular presses than in academic business journals. Relative to other industries, however, their was a paucity of academic research on the creative industries due in part, I suspect, to the diffi- culty of gaining access to firms and data. If I was going to become serious about conducting research, I needed to supplement my reading and develop contacts with leading practitioners in the industry who could educate me on how things really worked. by S. Mark Young Professor of Management and Organization KPMG Foundation Professorship in Accounting COVER STORY Art Commerce The Structure of Creative Industries
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Illustration by Cindy Ho 25 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA
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26 MARSHALL MAGAZINE SPRING 2004 As luck would have it, I gained access to a number of people through mutual friends, the vast Trojan Network, and the sheer generosity of strangers who were interested in what I was doing. I talked with studio heads, labor leaders, account- ants, attorneys, writers, regulators, managers, technicians, pro- ducers, marketers, directors, publicists, illustrators, disc jockeys, agents and even a few celebrities. I developed three basic goals: to develop a framework that would outline how the creative industries were organized and help me form a research agenda, to determine what key issues the industries currently faced, and finally to bring what I learned into the classroom. A General Framework for the Creative Industries The chart below presents a framework showing how the cre- ative industries are organized. While practices in each indus- try vary, the general structure is quite similar. For parsimony, I do not discuss how all of the variations manifest themselves, but do provide some examples of differences between the motion picture and music industries. At the core of the framework is the value chain which consists of five main stages: Properties, Talent and Intermediaries, Producers and Production, Marketing, Distribution and Customers. Other forces such as the Guilds and Unions and Federal regulatory agencies also play a central role in the environment. Properties, Talent and Intermediaries
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kmp paper on entertainment industry - COVER STORY Art...

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