Chapter3_Economic_Impact_Class

Chapter3_Economic_Impact_Class - Used by permission from...

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CHAPTER 3 The Measure of California Agriculture and its Importance in the State’s Economy 1 Daniel Sumner, José E. Bervejillo and Nicolai V. Kuminoff Daniel Sumner is the Frank H. Buck, Jr. Professor in the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics at University of California, Davis and Director of University of California Agricultural Issues Center; José E. Bervejillo is a post-graduate researcher, University of California Agricultural Issues Center; Nicolai Kuminoff is a former AIC researcher and currently a Ph.D. candidate at the Department of Economics, North Carolina State University. alifornia agriculture is large, diverse, complex and dynamic. This chapter documents the industry and its relationship to the rest of the economy. It also provides an overview of unifying forces and trends. Our aim is to supply a convenient compilation of facts and figures from a variety of sources, and to help the reader interpret the wide array of data presented. 2 California agriculture is far larger, measured by sales, than that of any other state. California agriculture produces more value than most countries and is larger than, for example, such major agricultural producers as Canada or Australia. 1 This chapter is updated and adapted from “The Measure of California Agriculture, 2000,” by Nicolai V. Kuminoff, and Daniel A. Sumner, with George Goldman, University of California Agricultural Issues Center. 2 Data used are the most recent available. Whenever possible, we used preliminary data from the most recent Census of Agriculture, (U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agriculture Statistics Service, 2002 Census of Agriculture). However the complete 2002 census data were not available at the time this chapter went to press. C
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The Measure of California Agriculture and its Importance in the State’s Economy 58 DEMAND AND SUPPLY California is part of the national and international agricultural markets. Californians consume food that is produced in the state, as well as food that is imported from other states and countries. Agriculture in California is the largest among the states, and produces a variety of animals and animal products, fruit, tree-nuts, vegetables, field crops, and nursery and floriculture products. The Central Valley (composed of the Sacramento and San Joaquin Valleys) accounts for more than half of the State’s gross value of agricultural production. Commodity Demand Between 1970 and 2001 United States per capita consumption of food increased in most categories. In the meat category, decreases in red meat consumption were more than offset by increases in poultry and fish. The largest percentage increases in consumption were in the fresh fruit, tree-nut and processed vegetable categories. Eggs were the only category showing a decrease. (Comparable data by state are not available.) Table 1. United States Per Capita Consumption of Major Foods, 1970-2001 Year Eggs a Meat, Poultry, Dairy Products Fruit, Fresh Fruit, Processing
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This note was uploaded on 10/06/2010 for the course ARE 130 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at UC Davis.

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Chapter3_Economic_Impact_Class - Used by permission from...

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