Genetics of Diabetes type 2 -...

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Type 2 diabetes has been loosely defined as "adult  onset" diabetes, although as diabetes becomes more common throughout the world, cases of type 2  diabetes are being observed in younger people. It is increasingly common in children. In determining the risk of developing diabetes,  environmental factors such as food intake and exercise  play an important role. The majority of individuals with  type 2 diabetes are either overweight or obese. Inherited  factors are also important, but the genes involved remain  poorly defined
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Official gene name:  potassium inwardly-rectifying  channel, subfamily J, member 11 Official gene symbol:  KCNJ11 Alias: inwardly rectifying potassium channel,  KIR6.2; beta-cell inward rectifier subunit, BIR;  ATPsensitive inward rectifier potassium channel  11, IKATP Closure of potassium channels in the beta cells of  the pancreas triggers the release of insulin.
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The KCNJ11 gene maps to chromosome 11. It has  only one exon (coding region) that spans about 2000  bases. Drugs that close the channel are used in the treatment  of diabetes. Variation of the KCNJ11 gene which  encodes this channel has been linked to both  increased and decreased insulin release
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Official gene name:  peroxisome proliferator activated  receptor gamma Official gene symbol:  PPARG Alias:  PPARG1, PPARG2 The PPAR  gene maps to chromosome 3 . It has 11  γ exons (coding regions) that span more than 140,000  bases.
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Nuclear receptors such as PPAR are one of the largest  groups of transcription factors known today. An important diabetes risk factor and drug target is 
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Genetics of Diabetes type 2 -...

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