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U.S. Constitution and Federalist Papers No. 10 & 51

U.S. Constitution and Federalist Papers No. 10 & 51...

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U.S. Constitution and Federalist Papers No. 10 & 51 Patrick Brandt GOVT 2302 U.S. Constitution and Federalist Papers No. 10 & 51 Patrick Brandt GOVT 2302
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U.S. Constitution and Federalist Papers No. 10 & 51 Patrick Brandt GOVT 2302 Why are these important? What is the basic question which the Federalist is addressing? Should we ratify the Constitution? Background : The Federalist Papers were written in 1788 by John Jay, Alexander Hamilton and James Madison. The goal was to convince the people of New York to ratify the Constitution which had been written at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia in 1787. Why write these and publish them in New York? New York was needed for ratification at the time of their writing. Later, other states ratified before New York. However, New York’s assent to the Constitution was crucial if the document was to work because the state was a large population center as well as a center of opinion and commerce.
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U.S. Constitution and Federalist Papers No. 10 & 51 Patrick Brandt GOVT 2302 Federalist Papers Papers were a response to critics of the Constitution. Critics were the Anti-Federalists. The Anti- writings are much longer and voluminous than the “Federalist Papers”. New York was key for the debates about passage (a social choice problem).
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U.S. Constitution and Federalist Papers No. 10 & 51 Patrick Brandt GOVT 2302 The Debate Federalists supported the Constitution. Anti-Federalists opposed the Constitution and the strong central government it would create. Anti-Federalists supported stronger state governments and a weaker national government.
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U.S. Constitution and Federalist Papers No. 10 & 51 Patrick Brandt GOVT 2302 Federalist 10 “The Union as a Safeguard Against Domestic Faction and Insurrection” Madison / Hamilton’s concern is developing a form of republican government that creates a “stable union.” Also need to deal with “faction.”
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U.S. Constitution and Federalist Papers No. 10 & 51 Patrick Brandt GOVT 2302 Definition of faction “By a faction, I understand a number of citizens, whether amounting to a majority or a minority of the whole, who are united and actuated by some common impulse of passion, or of interest, adversed to the rights of other citizens, or to the permanent and aggregate interests of the community.” Does this sound familiar? Who / what is a faction?
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U.S. Constitution and Federalist Papers No. 10 & 51 Patrick Brandt GOVT 2302 Factions are a problem . . . “AMONG the numerous advantages promised by a well constructed Union, none deserves to be more accurately developed than its tendency to break and control the violence of faction. The friend of popular governments never finds himself so much alarmed for their character and fate, as when he contemplates their propensity to this dangerous vice. He will not fail, therefore, to set a due value on any plan which, without violating the principles to which he is attached, provides a proper cure for it. The instability, injustice, and
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