Persuasion Effect Project.docx - Persuasion Effect Project Throughout my research this semester regarding microtransactions in the gaming industry

Persuasion Effect Project.docx - Persuasion Effect Project...

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Persuasion Effect Project Throughout my research this semester regarding microtransactions in the gaming industry I’ve been able to find countless articles about the negative impact they’ve had. How they’ve affected the market of the industry, how they’ve tainted the gaming experience, and how they’ve ruined the relationship between gamers and developers. What I haven’t been able to find is an article about how we can recover from this rough time for the gaming industry or what exactly we can do to make this a positive addition to gaming for both developers and gamers. Until recently. As Angelo M. D’Argenio says in his article “Many gamers would say microtransactions are evil; a way to suck money out of consumers that have already paid full price for a game.” So it’s no surprise that he created a list of 10 do’s and don’ts for developers to follow when implementing micro transactions. He continues later stating “But they don’t have to be evil! Microtransactions can be a powerful way to customize your gameplay experience… This should be the next evolution in gaming economics.” No one expects micro transactions to go. They’re here to stay. We just want to establish an ethical guideline to protect gamers from predatory practices of some companies and some forms of transactions. I want to go through D’Argenio’s list and determine what makes his recommendations good or not. Rule #1 - Never Lock Portions Of The Main Game Behind A Paywall A commonly used tactic in narrative based mobile games is to lock portions or even completion of its campaign behind a “paywall”; forcing players to spend money in order to complete it. This should not be the case with AAA titles as D’Argenio explains, purchasable content should feel like extra, not necessary. Rule #2 - Never Let Someone Pay For Power In A Multiplayer Game The most frustrating thing about some forms of microtransactions, is the advantage it gives to the players who are willing to spend money over the players who don’t. Carrie Rogers- Whitehead explains in her article on KSL.com, “This causes a ‘pay to win’ scenario, where players who only purchased the base game are trampled in online matches by other players of equal or lesser skill who spent the money on… the high-powered weapons and characters,"

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