CellBio1 - 2 Figure 4.1 The Scale of Life (Part 1) Light...

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Unformatted text preview: 2 Figure 4.1 The Scale of Life (Part 1) Light Microscope 3 Figure 4.3 Looking at Cells (Part 1) Figure 4.3 Looking at Cells (Part 2) 4 An Electron Microscope Figure 4.3 Looking at Cells (Part 3) 5 Cell Theory All living organisms are composed of cells Cells are the smallest units of life Cells are the structural and functional units of life All cells arise by division of pre-existing cells Figure 25.6 Figure 25.6 Fig 3.28 6 Limits of Cell Size Cell size is limited by the process of diffusion (diffusion is responsible for the fastest speed that molecules move through the cytoplasm) As a rule, an interior space can be no further than ~ 25 micrometers from the cell surface Figure 4.2 Why Cells Are Small (Part 2) THE SURFACE TO VOLUME RATIO MUST BE SUFFICIENTLY HIGH TO SUSTAIN LIFE 7 The biological world is divided into two major groups Prokaryotes Eukaryotes Figure 26.1 The Three Domains of the Living World 8 Living organisms are either unicellular (single cells) multicellular Multicellular organisms can attain large size can adopt many shapes have greater functional capabilities Prokaryotic organisms Always unicellular, always small No nucleusDNA is a single circular duplex Plasma membrane encased in a rigid cell wall Relatively simple internal organization Divide by Fssion 9 Prokaryotes come in many different shapes Figure 4.4 A Prokaryotic Cell 10 Some Prokaryotic Cells have Specialized Internal or External Structures SEVERAL EXAMPLES: In photosynthetic bacteria, the plasma membrane folds into the cytoplasm to form an internal membrane system where photosynthesis occurs. 11 Internal membrane structures Some bacteria have pili : thread-like structures projecting from the surface....
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This note was uploaded on 10/08/2010 for the course MCDB MCDB 1A taught by Professor Senghuilow during the Summer '09 term at UCSB.

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CellBio1 - 2 Figure 4.1 The Scale of Life (Part 1) Light...

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