Unit 4 Midter Project_Phil Sumner

Unit 4 Midter Project_Phil Sumner - 1 Death Row The...

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Death Row 1 The Livelihood of Death Row Inmates Phil Sumner Critical Issues in Corrections Professor Fox March 24, 2009
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Death Row 2 The death penalty has been an ongoing controversy in the United States since it was first recognized as a legal form of punishment in 1607 when Captain George Kendall was executed by a firing squad. Since the colonial times 13,000 people have been legally executed, and up until 1930 nearly 150 people were executed yearly (Religious Tolerance, 2009). In this paper the writer will give a brief history of the death penalty. He will then go into detail of how the inmates that have been condemned to death deal with life in prison while they await their day of execution. The writer will also describe any special privileges that these inmates might receive while being incarcerated on death row. The writer will then move away from the inmate role of the death penalty and will move into the public’s role and opinion of the death penalty. The writer will then begin to conclude this paper with his own personal views on this topic. He will include why he chose this population, and how he feels they should be treated while being incarcerated. From the colonial times to the 1930’s the death penalty was a flourishing form of punishment but the lack of public support and legality problems brought this form of punishment to a near halt by 1967. In 1972 the Supreme Court banned the practice of executing convicted felons of serious crimes. In 1976 the Supreme Court reinstated the death penalty with the stipulation that each state could decide whether or not they supported and employed the death penalty. Since the death penalty has been reinstated 38 states have determined that the death penalty was a just form of punishment. This leaves only twelve states to include ( Alaska, Hawaii, Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, North Dakota, Rhode Island, Vermont, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and the District of Columbia) that deem the death penalty an unnecessary form of punishment (Religious Tolerance, 2009). Since the death penalty has been reinstated there have been 784 executions performed in the United States this averages out
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Death Row 3 to be nearly 31 people per year. In the United States today there are currently 3,690 from 37 states sentenced to be executed (Religious Tolerance, 2009). Inmates that make up the death row population usually have no escape but their own mind to help them cope with reality of looking death in the eyes. Most death row inmates are segregated from the general population inmate and receive very few privileges. If these particular inmates receive outside recreation they are generally contained in a fenced cage that would remind you somewhat of a dog kennel. These cages are often long and narrow which doesn’t offer much room for activities other than pacing, pushup, and sit ups. Typically these types of prisoner’s spend most of their days confined to their cells. Death row inmates can spend anywhere from twenty to twenty- three hours confined in their cells with only their mind to keep
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This note was uploaded on 10/08/2010 for the course PSY/428 psy/428 taught by Professor Sunday during the Spring '10 term at University of Phoenix.

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Unit 4 Midter Project_Phil Sumner - 1 Death Row The...

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