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- Radiation and the Greenhouse Effect February 2 2010 ESPM/GEOG 1425 1 Forecast Challenge Available on WebVista Submission due by this Friday 5 th

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Unformatted text preview: Radiation and the Greenhouse Effect February 2, 2010 ESPM/GEOG 1425 1 Forecast Challenge Available on WebVista Submission due by this Friday 5 th at 5 pm Weather Briefing “Imagine a rotating sphere that is 12,800 kilometers (8000 miles) in diameter, has a bumpy surface, is surrounded by a 40-kilometer-deep mixture of different gases whose concentrations vary both spatially and over time, and is heated, along with its surrounding gases, by a nuclear reactor 150 million kilometers (93 million miles) away. Imagine also that this sphere is revolving around the nuclear reactor and that some locations are heated more during one part of the revolution and other locations are heated during another part of the revolution. And imagine that this mixture of gases continually receives inputs from the surface below, generally calmly but sometimes through violent and highly localized injections. Then, imagine that after watching the gaseous mixture, you are expected to predict its state at one location on the sphere one, two, or more days into the future. This is essentially the task encountered day by day by a weather forecaster.” -Bob Ryan, Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society (1982 ) The Forecaster’s Challenge Recap Fig. 2-3, p. 28 Stepped Art Fig. 2-5, p. 29 Fig. 2-6, p. 30 Fig. 2-9, p. 34 Fig....
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This note was uploaded on 10/08/2010 for the course GEOG 1172 taught by Professor Snyder during the Summer '10 term at Minnesota Colleges.

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- Radiation and the Greenhouse Effect February 2 2010 ESPM/GEOG 1425 1 Forecast Challenge Available on WebVista Submission due by this Friday 5 th

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