Complement_Indep_ME

Complement_Indep_ME - Complement, Independence, Mutually...

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Complement, Independence, Mutually Exclusive Complement and Mutually Exclusive Consider a course where, if completed, you can receive one of the following letter grades: A, B, C, D, or F and each has an equal probability of occurring. That is, P(A) – read probability of event A – is 0.20; P(B) = 0.20; and so on for the remaining three outcomes. Question: If we define event A as {getting an A in the course}, what is the complement of A (written A c )? Answer: The complement of event A would mean all outcomes not in event A. Thus the events in A c would be {getting a B, or a C, or a D, or an F}. So don’t think that just getting a B would be the complement of A; the complement is all outcomes not in event A. Question: Are the two events A = {getting an A in the course} and B = {getting a B in the course} mutually exclusive? Answer: Yes, these two events are mutually exclusive since they cannot occur at the same time: you cannot receive both an A and a B for the same course. Think of this current course; at the end of the semester you cannot be given an A and a B. Question: Are the two events A and B independent?
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Complement_Indep_ME - Complement, Independence, Mutually...

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