Lesson_05_Commentary

Lesson_05_Commentary - Brain Development neuron: single...

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Brain Development neuron: single cell unit of the central nervous system nerve: single cell unit of the peripheral nervous system dendrites: top of the neuron; extensions, branches; gather incoming information to pass it along to be processed soma (or cell body): central executive of the neuron; houses DNA in its nucleus; considered life support center of the neuron; It processes incoming information from dendrites and determines if a response is necessary. If the signals are strong enough, the soma may generate a message to send along to the rest of the neurons known as an action potential. axon: most neurons only have a single axon; transfer any messages sent by the soma down the body of the neuron so it may eventually be sent out to other neurons in the surrounding area; inside the axon, there are many tubule structures which act like superhighways to transport various organelles and provide structural support to the cell itself myelin sheath: cells that wrap around the axon; make up individual bulges around the outer surface of the axon; fatty white matter in brain; purpose of the myelin is to insulate the neuron and speed up the process of signals along the neuron terminals: located at the end of the neuron; responsible for releasing neurotransmitters which pass on the message that originated up in the soma; these neurotransmitters are the chemical message released into the space known as the synapse, which exist between the neurons and dendrites; once the message is picked is picked up by the dendrites, the whole process starts again
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Brain Development – Continued brain cells are cortical (surface) or subcortical (underneath) cortical can be divided into 4 main lobes; frontal, parietal, occipital and temporal frontal lobe: most posterior regions are involved with outgoing signals to muscle groups that allow us to move; interior regions associated with language; anterior region (also called prefrontal cortex) plays an important role in emotion regulation, impulse control, planning and problem-solving, all of which are developing during the teenage years
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Brain Demonstration cerebral cortex outermost covering of the brain largest part of your brain wrinkled outer layer of the brain controls "higher" mental processes that enhance learning, memory, thought, and language to fit inside the skull, the cerebral cortex has intricate folds called convolutions divided into two separate halves, or cerebral hemispheres two hemispheres are connected by a thick band of nerve fibers under the cortex called the corpus callosum four-inch-long, quarter-inch-thick bundles consists of millions of white nerve fibers that bridge the two hemispheres and carry messages back and forth between the left and right sides of the brain. each hemisphere is further divided along fissures, or deep grooves, into four lobes: occipital,
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Lesson_05_Commentary - Brain Development neuron: single...

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