I never lost as much but twice

I never lost as much but twice - only to have God restore...

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Date of Reading: October 12, 2009 Title: I never lost as much but twice Name of Author: Emily Dickinson Date of Writing: October 14, 2009 Country of Origin: United States of America Synopsis: Main Idea: The Speaker blames God for her losses Main Characters/ Characteristics: 1. The Speaker- Dickinson has lost everything thrice over and it's worth observing, also, that she's intimate enough with God, the "Father," to accuse Him of being a "Burglar" and a "Banker.". 2. God- the speaker calls speaker Father because he provided the friends she has cherished, Burglar-for stealing them back, and a Banker for he may be a repository for “deposits” that can be withdrawn at will, or whose investments involve risk or loss. Type of Writing : Poetry- clearly about loss and the diction suggests that death is responsible for the loss. Personal Responses: 1. Much of the poem refers to the Story of Job. She draws a parallel between herself and Job, who was once rich, wealthy and loses everything and becomes a beggar,
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Unformatted text preview: only to have God restore it later. 2. Like Job, she is a beggar on God's door, waiting for him to restore those things that were dear to her, just as he did with Job. It appears that she is suffering so much without them that it is as thought God has done this to test her faith, like Job. 3. There are many ways to interpret a poem and this is the way I interpret it. In Emily’s life she lost two friends. In this poem, it shows how she felt. She begged God to keep her friends here on earth. Both times God sent angels to help her. She is poor once more because she doesn't want to live anymore after her friends died. She is calling God a burglar, banker and father. I like how she includes burglar and banker because a burglar takes without asking and a banker takes as well, just asking and she's calling God both. 4. The poorness in her life may stand for the emptiness that death has brought her....
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