Chapter 8 Reading Group

Chapter 8 Reading Group - Understanding Development Chapter...

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Understanding Development Chapter 8: The End of Development of a New Beginning By the end of the 20 th century populism makes an appearance in various countries (Latin America in particular) Populism: o An ideology urging social and political system change o Driven by popular dissatisfaction with the neoclassical model of development o It is a style of politics, not a development model There had always been a common consensus that development was a desirable goal to be achieved by any country, however around the time of the end of communism their emerged a theory that opposed this idea. This was known as postdevelopment thought. The Emergence of Postdevelopment Thought p. 186 Postdevelopment theorists argue that: 1. Development does not represent an amelioration of living standards. It is a form of control 2. Modernization is simply an extension of the Western world and its nationalist allies in developing countries 3. The aim of development projects is to consolidate the power of modernizing elites 4. Human development is not the real goal of development because oftentimes progress for the state (boost in the economy/state revenues) may be a step backward for a small segment of society.
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Understanding Development 5. In practice, development is bureaucratic and depersonalizing (p.193) Joseph Stiglitz: Strong advocate against the neoclassical model of development but still supported globalization and development. Anti-globalization movement: Erupted after the Asian financial crisis Called for a return to local autonomy. Argued that globalization had neo- colonial/imperialist tendencies. Much development thought was not imposed on the developing world but derived from it. Much resistance comes not from “traditional areas” but from urban activists in the 1 st world. Structuralism from Latin America Etatisme/ Statism from Turkey Arguments Against postdevelopmental theory: Postdevelopmental theorists argue that: The nation-state draws people into the formal sector in order to consolidate their authority over the territory which is oppressive and forces people to stray from their traditional professions. People engage in the informal sector in order to resist the oppression. However developmental theorists argue that: o This resistance could be seen as simply a resistance to change. It hinders the economy because it takes revenue away from businesses in the formal sector.
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Understanding Development o Ex . In Jamaica roughly half of the economic activity takes place outside of the formal sector (informal trading, money laundering, etc.), making it hard for taxpaying businesses to stay in operation. o
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Chapter 8 Reading Group - Understanding Development Chapter...

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