Chap15 - 15 Examination 15.1 The Examiners Roles The role...

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15 Examination 15.1 The Examiner’s Roles The role of the examiner is to examine and evaluate the performance of the student and the results of the project. In Sect. 3.3 we outlined two typical roles that an examiner can take, i.e. quality evaluator and quality assuror. Depending on which role the examiner takes, it will affect his or her options for setting a grade for a stu- dent project. When acting as a quality evaluator, the examiner usually listens to a final presentation by the student and reads the final report. This has the advantage that the examiner only sees the final “product” and can evaluate the student only on the final achievements. This is fair, in the sense that it is the final product that matters, and any problems the student may have had along the way will not influence the grade if the final product is a good one. When acting as a quality assuror, the examiner will meet the student (and the supervisor) at different stages of the process. This has the advantage that the examiner gets more insight into the process. For example, if the examiner is present at initial presentations, where the students present the aims and objectives of their projects, this can give valuable information for evaluating the outcome of the projct. Projects that fail, or face severe difficulties, often do so because the aims and objectives were formulated vaguely or not chosen carefully. The student may later “repair” this in the final report, by updating the description of aims and objectives, but meet with difficulty because of the problems with the initial aims and objectives. On the other hand, the examiner may find it difficult to view the work afresh, uninfluenced by his or her previous judgement of earlier versions of the report or the work. When acting as a quality assuror, the examiner may find that he or she is taking on a supportive role, rather than an evaluative role. This can be difficult for a number of reasons. Any advice given by the examiner may later come back to him or her. For example, if the examiner advises a student to include item X in the list of objectives, the examiner will later have the role of evaluating the “wisdom” of including item X among the objectives. It then becomes difficult for the examiner to criticise the student for including this item. On the other hand, the examiner will may also not want to give the student credit for including item X, since it was the 145 M. Berndtsson et al. (eds.), Planning and Implementing your Computing Project - with Success! © Springer 2008
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146 15 Examination examiner’s own suggestion to include it. The “solution” to this dilemma may even be to reduce the students’ grade on the grounds of “lack of independence”. In conclusion, the result of the examiner’s well-meaning advice to the student is a reduced grade! There is no obvious solution to this dilemma, and our suggestion is merely to be
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This note was uploaded on 10/10/2010 for the course IFT 7002 taught by Professor Lamongtagne during the Spring '09 term at Université Laval.

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Chap15 - 15 Examination 15.1 The Examiners Roles The role...

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