Hispanic American Diversity - Hispanic American Diversity...

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Hispanic American Diversity Amber N. Hunter ETH 125
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1 Hispanics in the United States have significantly contributed to much of our society’s  customs and culture for many centuries. Ranging from politics, public service, military,  business, science, organized sports to even the entertainment industry, you can find their  mark universally if you take a closer look. It is quite a wonder as to the many historians  whom have not acknowledged Hispanics’ impact on history, as they are just as intricate  within America’s history as any other race or nationality (Contributions of). Mexican Americans consist of the most prevalent Hispanic group within the United States. Their history has covered over four centuries within America, contrasting in different regions. In such states as California, Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, and Nevada, great amounts of Mexican Americans subsist there. (“Mexican Americans,” 1997-2007) Linguistics: Mexican Americans, though they live in the United States, generally converse in their own native language. Spanish is usually the solitary language that they use at home amongst family and/or even friends, but in the general community, English is the universally unrestricted language. As the generations have passed on, a new verbal communication has emerged, called Spanglish, which is a blend of both Spanish and American. Social: America has been tough on Mexican Americans. The citizens had a hard time elevating their financial and social status in this country, as they were judged by color of their skin. However, color should not demonstrate a person’s social status, but the content of their character. These people are slowly emerging and breaking social barriers.
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2 Economic: The Chicano Movement changed Mexican Americans’ lives in the United States’ economy. It was a movement that secured these people in the economy with civil rights and economic opportunity. They used tactics such as civil disobedience as an influential way to make it known that “changes” were inevitable. Marches, hunger strikes, and litigation were methods that they used. Political: On the other hand, the Chicano Movement also sparked a political consciousness in the community—something that had never been experienced before by the community.
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