3_Medicalization - A Multi-Dimensional Concept - Ballard and Elston

3_Medicalization - A Multi-Dimensional Concept - Ballard and Elston

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
patients and lay people. This leads us to consider more nuanced, multi- dimensional accounts of specific conditions, which indicate that medicalisa- tion might be a much more complex, ambiguous, and contested process than the ‘medicalisation thesis’ of the 1970s implied. Finally, we return to consider the macro-level societal context and likely trends in medicalisation. THE CONCEPT OF MEDICALISATION Medicalisation has been defined as a ‘process whereby more and more of everyday life has come under medical dominion, influence and supervision’ (Zola, 1983, p. 295). The idea that medicine might be enlarging its sphere of influence to incorporate more and more aspects of the social world emerged during the 1960s. Critics of psychiatry (eg Szasz, 1963) expressed concerns over the increasing tendency for socially problematic behaviours such as excess alcohol consumption and, at that time, homosexuality to be regarded and treated as medical conditions. This growing reliance on medicine also
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 10/10/2010 for the course ENG 000121 taught by Professor Mcgrand during the Spring '10 term at Cornell University (Engineering School).

Ask a homework question - tutors are online