{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

5_Pro-Ana(2) - 2005 As a re in these rse Via the...

Info icon This preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: ,-, 2005). As a re, in these rse Via the aetiologies The online Pro—Ana movement 95 The politics of Pro-Ana Perhaps unsurprisingly, cyberspace is being utilized by Pro—Ana users as a way of networking and finding support from others v a position that contrasts greatly with discourses that position Pro-Ana sites as subversive (Pollack, 2003). The importance of these networks must be considered in the wider context, where eat- ing disorders are extremely complex, damaging and isolating conditions, but often remain grossly unreported (Walstrom 2000: 762). In many ways, Pro—Ana occupies a political space, mobilizing digital environments to make public body- narratives that might otherwise go untold (Dias 2003). That these narratives occur in digital contexts is no coincidence. Indeed, part of our interest in cyber-commu— nities and eating disorders stems from work elsewhere where we have highlighted that young women tend to experience a lack of ‘relatedness’ (Warin 2003: 89) between the experiences they wanted to voice to significant others and the stories they actually told (see Rich and Evans 2005). As was discussed in Chapter 5, embodied, painful and often chaotic narratives of illness can be silenced by wider medicalized discourses of health and illness. The exchange of alternative body- narratives around eating disorders resonates with the sort of cyborg presence in Haraway’s manifesto: ‘Cyborg writing is about the power to survive, not on the basis of original innocence, but on the basis of seizing the tools to mark the world that marked them as other’ (1991: 175). As with others, our interest is to consider how discourses of anorexia within cyberspace may offer alternative ‘explanatory models’ (Fox et al. 2005b) of the body, health and illness. Like other eating disorders, anorexia is an extremely com- plex condition variously understood and much debated across the disciplines of psychiatry, medicine, psychology, biology, sociology and epidemiology. Our inten- tion is not to understate the sophistication of the perspectives that abound within these fields (see Lask and Bryant~Waugh 2000). Thus, discourses of anorexia draw upon various frameworks of understanding, from biomedical models that evaluate anorexia as a disease with an underlying ‘organic’ cause (Urwin et a1. 2002) to those that emphasize the psychological, social and cultural roots of eating disor- ders. Fox et al. (2005b: 945) suggest that while the causal explanations and treatment recommendations vary across these western models, they differ from Pro-Ana in that they ‘all serve as explanatory models of a disease to be remedied’. Our interest in the formation of Pro-Ana networks connects with research exploring how anorexia comes to be managed as both an identity and an illness (Rich 2006). These tensions emerge at the intersection of competing discourses around what constitutes anorexia and how, if at all, it should be managed or treated. Young women with anorexia often find that significant others in their lives tend to position, themselves against discourses of disease. In doing so, a ‘restitution narrative’ (Frank 1995) is often invoked when trying to offer support and make sense of these conditions (Rich 2006). This narrative is grounded in the ideals associated with treatment and reparation. It centres on what will be done to restore the body to its former state before illness, or towards medically defined standards of the healthy body. This narrative centres on the expectation ...
View Full Document

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern