7_Medicalization - A Multi-Dimensional Concept - Ballard and Elston

7_Medicalization - A Multi-Dimensional Concept - Ballard and Elston

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replacement therapy (HRT). Although the increased use of HRT over the latter part of the 20th century arguably constitutes at least partial medicalisation of the menopause, Griffiths (1999) found that women were not simply passive recipients of medical intervention. Rather, they were active in seeking and evaluating information about HRT, and also questioned the doctors’ advice. As Lewis (1993) argues, the medicalisation of natural life processes such as childbirth and the menopause is not necessarily a matter of medical conspiracy, but a process in which many women have made demands for the ‘best’ care, while also sometimes resisting medicalisation. Similarly, Denny (1994) and Rajan (1996) have used empirical evidence to show how medical technology can serve as a resource for women, and as a means of liberation from the constraints of their embodiment. Those who regard the lay populace as active participants, therefore, might view medicalisation as representing the positive utilization of
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This note was uploaded on 10/10/2010 for the course ENG 000121 taught by Professor Mcgrand during the Spring '10 term at Cornell University (Engineering School).

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