9_Medicalization - A Multi-Dimensional Concept - Ballard and Elston

9_Medicalization - A Multi-Dimensional Concept - Ballard and Elston

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respiratory infections, which appears to have led to a decline in medical consultation for these conditions. These examples suggest that the extent and form of medicalisation of specific kinds of deviance or life experience, and the degree to which any process of medicalisation is sustained over time, varies according to the social or cultural authority and the level of mobilisation of those making (or resisting) claims, and the perceived efficacy of any medical intervention. Moreover, it is also possible that, by the end of the 20th century, there was new potential for demedicalisation arising from wider social changes, and from the very process of medicalisation that appeared to be so pervasive three decades earlier. In the next section, we consider this possibility. THE SOCIETAL CONTEXT AND THE CHANGING POTENTIAL FOR MEDICALISATION As illustrated above, much of the medicalisation literature has focused on the roles that the medical profession and, latterly, the lay population have played
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This note was uploaded on 10/10/2010 for the course ENG 000121 taught by Professor Mcgrand during the Spring '10 term at Cornell University (Engineering School).

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