10_From Hyperactive Children to ADHD Adults - Conrad and Potter (1)

10_From Hyperactive Children to ADHD Adults - Conrad and Potter (1)

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From Hyperactive Children to ADHD Adults 567 present thirteen sub-types of the disorder, a set of "suggested diagnostic criteria," and offer a 100-question test (with elusive criteria7) for readers to assess whether or not they may need to seek evaluation for ADHD. The authors urge readers not to self-diagnose, but seek professional assessment of their condition. Neither Hallowell nor Ratey is a hyperactivity researcher-Ratey published only one article on the topic in a professional journal (Ratey, et al. 1992) and Hallowell, none. Both remain very active in promoting their work in public circles. Their affiliation with Harvard Medical School gave them some academic legitimacy, but they came to the area of ADHD adults more as professional advocates than as scientific researchers. In a sense, they are moral entrepreneurs for the adult diagnosis (Leffers 1997). The cover of July 18, 1994 Time magazine issued a clarion call for ADHD adults: "Disorga- nized? Distracted? Discombobulated? Doctors Say You Might Have ATTENTION DEFICIT DISORDER. It's not just kids who have it." The 9-page article disseminated the criteria and possibilities
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This note was uploaded on 10/10/2010 for the course ENG 000121 taught by Professor Mcgrand during the Spring '10 term at Cornell University (Engineering School).

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