10_Medicalization, Markets, and Consumers - Conrad and Leiter

10_Medicalization, Markets, and Consumers - Conrad and Leiter

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JOURNAL OF HEALTH AND SOCIAL BEHAVIOR boundaries demarcating "legitimate" and "off- label" use of human growth hormone.4 In 2003, the FDA approved Eli Lilly's Humatrope to treat idiopathic short stature children in the shortest 1.2 percent of the population, which will likely accelerate its use in potentially short children (Kaufman 2003). There is some evidence that shortness (and especially extreme shortness) often is a deval- ued status and can have social consequences, especially for males. Some researchers have found social disadvantages of shortness, including discrimination in hiring and salaries, assumptions regarding maturity and compe- tence, issues around self-esteem and perceived attractiveness, and practical problems such as buying well-fitting clothes (see Conrad and Potter 2004). Whatever the real or imagined disadvantages of shortness, some parents have anxieties about their children's height. With the availability of synthetic human growth hor- mone, parents could consider interventions that would influence the height of their chil- dren. At least
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  • Spring '10
  • McGrand
  • In vitro fertilisation, in vitro fertilization, vitro fertilization, human growth hormone, vitro fertilization services, growth hormone treatment

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