Psychology_and_your_Life_Ch01[1]

Psychology_and_your_Life_Ch01[1] - PSYCHOLOGY and your life...

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Unformatted text preview: PSYCHOLOGY and your life 2 1 chapter introduction to p s yc h o l o g y 3 It was every subway rider’s nightmare, times two. Who has ridden along New York’s 656 miles of sub- way lines and not wondered: “What if I fell to the tracks as a train came in? What would I do?” And who has not thought: “What if someone else fell? Would I jump to the rescue?” Wesley Autrey, a 50-year-old construction worker and navy veteran, faced both those questions in a flashing instant yesterday and got his answers almost as quickly. Mr. Autrey was waiting for the downtown local at 137th Street and Broadway in Manhattan around 12:45 p.m. He was taking his two daughters, Syshe, 4, and Shuqui, 6, home before work. Nearby, a man collapsed, his body convulsing. Mr. Autrey and two women rushed to help, he said. The man, Cameron Hollopeter, 20, managed to get up, but then stumbled to the platform edge and fell to the tracks, between the two rails. The headlights of the No. 1 train appeared. “I had to make a split decision,” Mr. Autrey said. So he made one, and leapt. Mr. Autrey lay on Mr. Hollopeter, his heart pounding, pressing him down in a space roughly a foot deep. The train’s brakes screeched, but it could not stop in time. Five cars rolled overhead before the train stopped, the cars passing inches from his head, smudging his blue knit cap with grease. Mr. Autrey heard onlookers’ screams. “We’re O.K. down here,” he yelled, “but I’ve got two daughters up there. Let them know their father’s O.K.” He heard cries of wonder, and applause. . . . “I don’t feel like I did something spectacular; I just saw someone who needed help,” Mr. Autrey said. “I did what I felt was right.” (Buckley, 2007, p. 1) A Gift of Life Wesley Autrey’s extraordinarily brave behavior illustrates the best of human nature. It also gives rise to a host of intriguing questions. For example, • How did Autrey make the split-second decision to give aid to the man who fell onto the tracks? Would he have made the same decision if he had more time to think about it? • What physical and biological changes occurred when Autrey leapt onto the tracks? • What emotions did Autrey experience as the subway car hurtled by above him? • What memories will Autrey’s children have when they think back to the frightening spectacle of the subway passing over their father, and will it affect their later lives? • Why was Autrey the only one who offered help even though dozens of others witnessed the event? As we’ll soon see, psychology addresses questions like these—and many, many more. In this chap- ter, we begin our examination of psychology, the different types of psychologists, and the various roles that psychologists play....
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This note was uploaded on 10/10/2010 for the course PSY 201 taught by Professor Victoriawhite during the Spring '10 term at University of the East, Manila.

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Psychology_and_your_Life_Ch01[1] - PSYCHOLOGY and your life...

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