Psychology_and_your_Life_Ch06

Psychology_and_your_Life_Ch06 - 6thinking l anguage 198...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
6 chapter thinking : memory , cognition , and language 198
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
199 ahead l o o k i n g What do jock itch, poison gas, and flesh-eating bacte- ria have in common? Gregory Schultz, 56, thinks he has the answer. The cancer researcher turned inven- tor has patented a technique for chemically bonding bacteria-fighting polymers to such fabrics as gauze bandages, cotton T shirts, and men’s underpants. It’s a technology with an unusually wide variety of uses, from underwear that doesn’t stink to hospital dress- ings that thwart infections. The bandages, coated with positively charged anti- microbial molecules, dramatically reduce the risk of infection, Schultz says, and as a bonus they can pre- vent outbreaks of the drug-resistant staph infections that have been racing through U.S. hospitals. “It basi- cally punches holes in the bacteria,” he says, “and they pop like balloons.” (Morrissey, 2006) Microbe-Busting Bandages Schultz’s invention was a long time in coming. Two decades earlier, a student working in a burn unit men- tioned that the way in which cells responded to cancer might be harnessed to help burn victims avoid infec- tion. It took 20 years of puzzling over the problem before Schultz invented his antibacterial bandages. It is clear that Schultz has the elusive quality that marks successful inventors: creativity. Where did his creativity come from? More generally, how do people use information to devise innovative solutions to problems? And how do people think about, understand, and, through language, describe the world? Answers to these questions come from ±cognitive±psychology,± the± branch of psychology that focuses on the study of higher mental pro- cesses, including thinking, language, memory, problem solving, know- ing, reasoning, judging, and decision making. Clearly, the realm of cognitive psychology is broad. Cognitive psychology centers on three major topics: memory, thinking and reasoning, and language. We start this chapter by considering memory and forgetting. Then we examine how people think and reason as well as different strategies for approaching problems. Finally, we discuss how language is developed and acquired, its basic characteristics, and the relationship between language and thought. Cognitive psychology The branch of psychology that focuses on the study of higher mental processes, including thinking, language, memory, problem solving, knowing, reasoning, judging, and decision making. c h a p t e r o u t l i n e m o d u l e 1 8 The Foundations of Memory ±Sensory±Memory± ±Short-Term±Memory± L o n g - T e r m M e m o r y 1 9 Recall and Forgetting ±Retrieval±Cues± ±Levels±of±Processing± ±Explicit±and±Implicit±Memory± ±Flashbulb±Memories± Constructive Processes in Memory: Rebuilding the Past ±Exploring±Diversity:± Are There Cross-Cultural Differences in Memory?
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 10/10/2010 for the course PSY 201 taught by Professor Victoriawhite during the Spring '10 term at University of the East, Manila.

Page1 / 44

Psychology_and_your_Life_Ch06 - 6thinking l anguage 198...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online