Chapter 4 - Chapter 4 Social groups and formal...

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Chapter 4: Social groups and formal organizations
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Social groups “two or more people who are bound together in relatively stable patterns of social interaction and who share a feeling of unity.”
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Social Groups Formal vs. informal “Street Corner Society”, Whyte Primary vs. secondary In-group vs. out-group “Robber’s Cave Experiment”, Sherif
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Sherif The Robber’s Cave Experiment 1. Group building 2. Competition a. Intergroup hostility How to Build Intergroup Cooperation? 1. Contact? 2. Common goals
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Social groups Reference group Normative – may begin to do things that that the group they want to be in do Comparative – judge and evaluate ourselves in terms of our group
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The size of groups Dyads – fragile demanding, ratifying Triads Larger groups – productive – offer more suggestions about what source of action someone should take – less tension – less satisfied with roles 5-person groups – ideal size – less fragile – less tension – more satisfaction than lg – deadlocks are unlikely
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Why Do People Form Groups? 1. Instrumental groups – formed to perform tasks that would be impossible for one person to do alone (surgical team, builders) 2. Expressive groups – goal is to satisfy members needs for acceptance and esteme (friendship groups (ski group), poker, party groups) 3. Supportive groups – band together to deal with difficult emotional issues
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Leadership in Groups Instrumental leaders – organizing group, making suggestions about
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