BIO201 - Lecture 36

BIO201 - Lecture 36 - Lecture 36 Fri Tubulin flux in...

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Lecture 36. Fri. 4-18-08
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Tubulin flux in metaphase Even though mitotic chromosomes appear stationary, chromosomal MTs are still dynamic The rate of tubulin addition is similar to the rate of loss so the MTs “treadmill” in metaphase Could chromosomal MTs become radioactive if “hot” tubulin was added during metaphase?
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Anaphase
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How do you know you’re in anaphase? Sister chromatids have come apart but they aren’t very close to the poles yet How many mitotic chromosomes (paired chromatids) in anaphase?
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Spindle Checkpoint assures that all chromosomes reach the spindle equator before anaphase begins Note that the one chromosome that isn’t aligned has the spindle checkpoint protein (pink) bound to it. Tubulin (green) Chromosomes (blue) Spindle checkpoint protein (pink)
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An improperly attached chromosome stalls the cell in metaphase
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Anaphase Sister chromatids separate Anaphase A. Chromatids move towards the poles by mitotic shortening. Anaphase B. Poles move apart. 1 mitotic chromosome 2 single chromatids (2 paired chromatids) What causes the poles to move apart in Anaphase?
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Poles don’t move. Chromosomes move toward poles Note: No change in the distance between the poles but MTs get shorter Metaphase Anaphase A What is the major force that pulls the sister chromatids apart? How could you test this?
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BIO201 - Lecture 36 - Lecture 36 Fri Tubulin flux in...

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