BIO201 - Lecture 35

BIO201 - Lecture 35 - Lecture 35. Wed. 4-16-08 Prophase...

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Lecture 35. Wed. 4-16-08
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Prophase (continued) Spindle formation 2. Pericentriolar material surrounding centrioles serves as the nucleation site (MTOC) for cytoplasmic microtubules + + + + + + + + - - - - - - - - Pole Pole 4. Breakdown of the nuclear envelope, ER and golgi 3. The initial spindle pole forms outside of the nucleus Are mitotic chromosomes connected to MTs in prophase?
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How can you tell you’re in prophase? 1. Mitotic chromosomes are seen but they aren’t clustered near the middle 2. MTs from the mitotic spindle (aster) have not made contact with any chromosomes mitotic <
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1. A protein complex on the centromere is called the kinetochore. 2. The plus ends of chromosomal MTs start to “capture” mitotic chromosomes at their kinetochores 3. Mitotic chromosomes begin to move (oscillate) and end up near the spindle equator at the end of prometaphase 4. Sister chromatids start to align in amphitelic orientation. Amphitelic means that each chromatid faces opposite poles. Are all of the sister chromatids amphitelic throughout prometaphase?
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BIO201 - Lecture 35 - Lecture 35. Wed. 4-16-08 Prophase...

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