lecture10

lecture10 - CSE 135 Server Side Web Languages Lecture # 10...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–7. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
CSE 135 Server Side Web Languages Lecture # 10 Web App Security Attacks and Defense
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
CSE 135 Server Side Web Languages Lecture # 10 The Problem The Golden Rule: On the public Web you truly cannot trust users nor the data they submit. Many potential visitors with various motivations for visiting your site customer, competitor, potential employee, media, activist, terrorist, hacker, ‘indexer’, etc. Users may directly access or of course have bots do it for them • How do you separate the good from the bad? • First - how and why attacks may occur
Background image of page 2
CSE 135 Server Side Web Languages Lecture # 10 Thinking Like a “Hacker” I’ll use the word ‘hacker’ to characterize anyone trying to gain access to a Web site/application without authorization and won’t address ethics or jargon precision So what do Web hackers do and why? Goal: They want to crack your site Why: dislike, hactivism, $ or advantage gain, etc. Notes: concentrated effort or desire -> may not leave right away, may have insider knowledge, may be dangerous or malicious Goal: They want to crack any site Why: use an attack platform, because they can, save things, street cred, etc. Notes: focus on volume and ease, may leave if too much work, usually little insider knowledge, often not malicious, often called ‘script kiddies’
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
CSE 135 Server Side Web Languages Lecture # 10 How they do it in general • Exploit a weakness with The network itself • Physical or software based monitoring The computer itself • Likely a physical compromise though maybe a trojan The OS • Bug or stolen credential Web Server Software • Typically a bug Web Application • custom or purchased • Bug, credential issues, Web app specific exploits The people involved • Social engineering
Background image of page 4
CSE 135 Server Side Web Languages Lecture # 10 Reconnaissance • Smart attackers try to gain as much useful knowledge as possible to plan an attack or find a weakness “Case the joint” versus “jiggle the knobs” Dumb attackers jiggle knobs too much and get picked up by IDS (Intrusion Detection Systems) or other monitoring efforts Smart attacker passively watches collecting information with occasional jiggles and try to exploit once they have a plan • General Countermeasures: Camouflage Misinformation and Misdirection Active Surveillance
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
CSE 135 Server Side Web Languages Lecture # 10 Reconnaissance: OS Detection Determine OS and then try to find a known bug that may not have been patched against yet Example Tool: Nmap (insecure.org) Example Service: Netcraft.com How it works Inspect packets (actively or better yet passively based upon a particular request malformed or well formed) and look carefully for subtle telltale signs that different operating systems have in their TCP implementations • This is generally dubbed “fingerprinting” Countermeasures “Smudge” fingerprint with a TCP stack parameter tune
Background image of page 6
Image of page 7
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 10/10/2010 for the course CSE CSE135 taught by Professor Powell during the Summer '10 term at UCSD.

Page1 / 62

lecture10 - CSE 135 Server Side Web Languages Lecture # 10...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 7. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online