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Evaluation: Randomised Controlled Trials Human-Computer Interaction Comp 3900 and Comp 6390 Semester 2, 2010 1 Lecture 5A & 5B: Human-Computer Interaction, Semester 2, 2010
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Types of evaluation (1) Evaluation to match requirements/specification Fault finding Cognitive walkthroughs Heuristic evaluation Unit testing/laboratory testing Lecture 5A & 5B: Human-Computer Interaction, Semester 2, 2010 2 System/integration testing Evaluation to test observable qualities Usability lab Performance measures on standard data sets (for example, timing tests)
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Types of evaluation (2) Evaluation in actual use Qualitative evaluation What will the users do with this system? How will they use the system? Lecture 5A & 5B: Human-Computer Interaction, Semester 2, 2010 3 Quantitative evaluation How well does this system compare to previous or competing systems?
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Quantitative evaluation Requires a quantity (i.e. a measurement) Uses a measurement of performance to compare the system being evaluated with other competing systems. Lecture 5A & 5B: Human-Computer Interaction, Semester 2, 2010 4 Uses statistical analysis to make judgements about the comparison between measurements taken with one system and measurements taken with another system.
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Statistics (1) A statistic is a measurement of some attribute (variable) of one member of a population. A sample is a group of members taken from a population. Lecture 5A & 5B: Human-Computer Interaction, Semester 2, 2010 5 Sample statistics are the set of measurements of an attribute (variable) of the members in the sample (that had been taken from a population).
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Statistics (2) The distribution of a variable for a particular sample is the way that the values of that variable Lecture 5A & 5B: Human-Computer Interaction, Semester 2, 2010 6 are spread along the number line. Shown graphically as a histogram.
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Statistics (3) Second example: the variable can have values with decimal places (“real” numbers) Lecture 5A & 5B: Human-Computer Interaction, Semester 2, 2010 7
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Statistics (4) We can do arithmetic with the values of a variable: Compute the mean and variance and standard deviation Lecture 5A & 5B: Human-Computer Interaction, Semester 2, 2010 8 Find the median (line them up in increasing order and find the middle value) Find the mode (the most common value)
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Sample versus Population A sample is a subset of a population.
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