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Human Factors Experiments Human-Computer Interaction Comp 3900 and Comp 6390 Semester 2, 2010 1 Lecture 6C: Human-Computer Interaction, Semester 2, 2010
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Human factors testing in the design of Xerox’s 8010 “Star” office workstation Reading brick article 9, published in CHI’83 ACM SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Lecture 6C: Human-Computer Interaction, Semester 2, 2010 2 Computing Systems www.acm.org and select “Digital Library”
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General purpose office workstation Contrast: Word processors, used by secretarial and admin personnel Computers, used by technically-trained workers Lecture 6C: Human-Computer Interaction, Semester 2, 2010 3 This new system would be used by “casual users who demand extensive functionality at a small training cost”. “The designers’ intuitions could not always be used as the criteria for an acceptable system”
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Design principles from cognitive psychology Explicit user’s model of the system, familiar and consistent Seeing and pointing is easier than remembering a name and typing it Lecture 6C: Human-Computer Interaction, Semester 2, 2010 4 Commands should be uniform across domains ( delete a word, delete a graphic, delete item from a database) The screen should show the state of an object “What you see is what you get” WYSIWYG
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Tasks for the designers 1. Prototype the user interface so that the designers and “others” could get a feel for what they were working on 2. Theoretical analysis of performance (Card, Lecture 6C: Human-Computer Interaction, Semester 2, 2010 5 Moran and Newell’s Keystroke Level Model) to estimate the time required to perform large office tasks 3. Formal human-factors experiments.
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Keystroke Level Model Sharp et al. Interaction Design, p708 For tasks that involve keyboard (mouse, etc).
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