caa operation of aircraft 2014.pdf - STATUTORY INSTRUMENTS SUPPLEMENT No 18 10th June 2014 STATUTORY INSTRUMENTS SUPPLEMENT to The Uganda Gazette No 35

caa operation of aircraft 2014.pdf - STATUTORY INSTRUMENTS...

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Unformatted text preview: STATUTORY INSTRUMENTS SUPPLEMENT No. 18 10th June, 2014 STATUTORY INSTRUMENTS SUPPLEMENT to The Uganda Gazette No. 35 Volume CVII dated 10th June, 2014 Printed by UPPC, Entebbe, by Order of the Government. S T A T U T O R Y I N S T R U M E N T S 2014 No. 64. THE CIVIL AVIATION (OPERATION OF AIRCRAFT) REGULATIONS, 2014 ARRANGEMENT OF REGULATIONS Regulation PART I—PRELIMINARY. 1. Title. 2. Interpretation. PART II—GENERAL OPERATIONS REQUIREMENTS. Aircraft requirements 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. Registration markings Civil aircraft airworthiness Restricted Certificate of airworthiness Aircraft instruments and equipment Inoperative instruments and equipment Aircraft flight manual, marking and placard requirements Required aircraft and equipment Documents to be carried on aircraft Production of documents Preservation of documents Insurance Stowaways Co-ordination of activities potentially hazardous to civil aircraft Power to prohibit or restrict flying or landing or taking off Balloons, kites and airships 1 Regulation PART III - AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE REQUIREMENTS 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. Aircraft maintenance requirements Maintenance required. Operator’s maintenance responsibilities Operator’s maintenance control manual Maintenance programme Content of the maintenance programme Safety programme and management system Inspections: commercial air transport Progressive inspection Changes to aircraft maintenance programmes Inspections: all other aircraft Maintenance records Maintenance records retention. Transfer of maintenance records PART IV - FLIGHT CREW REQUIREMENTS 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48. 49. Composition of flight crew Operations under IFR or at night In-flight procedures - Heliport operating minima Heliport operating minima under IFR Requirements of experience, recency and training for single pilot operations at night or instrument flight rules. Pilot authorisation in lieu of a type rating. Pilot recent experience: Pilot-In-Command, co-pilot cruise relief pilot. Pilot-In-Command: route and airport qualification Pilot proficiency checks. Licences required Pilots: Qualifications Rating required for IFR operations. Special authorisation required for Category II or III operations. Recording of flight time Pilot-in-command and co-pilot currency: take-offs and landings Pilot currency: IFR operations Pilot currency: general aviation operations Pilot privileges and limitations 2 Regulation PART V - CREW MEMBER DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES 50. 51. 52. 53. 54. 55. 56. 57. 58. 59. 60. 61. 62. 63. 64. 65. 66. 67. 68. 69. 70. 71. 72. 73. 74. 75. 76. 77. 78. 79. 80. 81. Authority and responsibility of the Pilot-In-Command Authority of the Pilot-In-Command Compliance with local regulations Compliance by a foreign operator with laws, regulations and procedures Surveillance of operations by a foreign operator Imperilling the safety of persons and property Fitness of crew members Use of narcotics, drugs or intoxicating liquor Crew member use of seatbelts and shoulder harnesses Flight crew members at duty stations Required crew member equipment. Compliance with checklists. Search and rescue information. Information on emergency and survival equipment carried Locking of cockpit compartment door. Admission to the cockpit Power to inspect Duties during critical phases of flight Microphones. Manipulation of the controls: commercial air transport. Simulated abnormal situations in flight: commercial air transport. Completion of the technical logbook: commercial air transport. Reporting mechanical irregularities. Reporting of facility and navigation aid inadequacies. Reporting of incidents Hazardous flight conditions Accident notification. Operation of flight recorders Crew member oxygen supply Use of oxygen. Carriage of dangerous goods Portable electronic devices. PART VI—FLIGHT PLANS AND AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL CLEARANCE Operational Flight Planning and Preparation 82. Pre-flight action 83. Operation of aircraft on the ground 3 Regulation 84. 85. 86. 87. 88. 89. 90. 91. 92. 93. 94. 95. 96. 97. 98. 99. 100. 101. 102. 103. 104. 105. 106. 107. 108. Flight into known or expected icing Aerodrome operating minima Take-off conditions. Altimeter settings. Operation of radio in aircraft Weather reports and forecasts Weather limitations for visual flight rules flights Adequacy of operating facilities Diversions decision: engine inoperative Instrument flight rules destination aerodromes Instrument flight rules alternate aerodrome selection criteria Off-shore alternates for helicopter operations Take-off alternate aerodromes: commercial air transport operations. Destination alternate heliport Maximum distance from an adequate aerodrome for two-engined aeroplanes without an ETOPS approval Extended range operations with two-engined aeroplanes En-route alternate aerodromes: ETOPS operations. Fuel and oil supply. Flight planning: document distribution and retention Commercial air transport: loading of aircraft Aircraft loading, mass and balance Stowage of baggage and cargo. Maximum allowable weights to be considered on all load manifests. Flight release required: commercial air transport Operational flight plan: commercial air transport PART VII - AIRCRAFT OPERATING AND PERFORMANCE LIMITATIONS 109. 110. 111. 112. 113. 114. 115. 116. 117. 118. All Aircraft Aircraft airworthiness and safety precautions Performance and operating limitations In-flight simulation of abnormal situations Test-flight areas Operation in RNP, MNPS or RVSM airspace Reports of height-keeping performance Electronic navigation data management Compliance with visual and electronic glide slopes. Restriction or suspension of operations: commercial air transport Continuation of flight when destination aerodrome is temporarily restricted: commercial air transport. 4 Regulation 119. Continuation of Instrument flight rules flight toward a destination. 120. Operations of single-engine aircraft. 121. Operations of single-engine turbine-powered aircraft at night or in instrument meteorological conditions 122. Instrument flight rules take-off minima for commercial air transport. 123. Instrument approach procedures and Instrument flight rules landing minima. 124. Commencing an instrument approach 125. Instrument approaches to aerodromes 126. Threshold crossing height for precision approaches. 127. Operation below decision height or minimum descent altitude 128. Landing during instrument meteorological conditions 129. Execution of a missed approach procedure 130. Minimum altitudes for use of an autopilot 131. Minimum flight altitudes 132. Receiver failure 133. Aircraft performance calculations for all aircrafts 134. General weight and obstruction clearance limitations 135. Category II and III operations: general operating rules 136. Category II and Category III: operations manual. 137. Authorization for deviation from certain Category II operations Aircraft used in Commercial Air Transport Operation 138. 139. 140. 141. 142. 143. 144. General Rules of the air and air traffic control. Aircraft performance calculations for commercial air transport Take-off limitations En-route limitations: all engines operating En-route limitations: one engine inoperative En-route limitations: three or more engines, two engines inoperative. 145. Landing limitations 146. 147. 148. 149. 150. PART VIII - PASSENGER AND PASSENGER HANDLING All Passenger- Carrying Operations Unacceptable conduct. Refuelling or defuelling with passengers on board. Passenger seats, safety belts and shoulder harnesses Passenger briefing: non air operator certificate holder aircraft. In-flight emergency instruction. 5 Regulation 151. Passenger oxygen: minimum supply and use. 152. Alcohol or drugs 153. Use of psychoactive substances Commercial Air Transport Passenger Carrying Operations 154. Passenger compliance with instructions. 155. Denial of transportation. 156. Carriage of Persons Without Compliance with Passenger-Carrying Requirements 157. Cabin crew at duty stations. 158. Evacuation capability. 159. Arming of automatic emergency exits. 160. Accessibility of emergency exits and equipment. 161. Stops where passengers remain on board 162. Carriage of persons with reduced mobility 163. Exit row seating. 164. Carriage of munitions of war 165. Prohibition against carriage of weapons. 166. Oxygen for medical use by passengers 167. Carry-on baggage. 168. Carriage of cargo in passenger compartments. 169. Passenger information signs. 170. Required passenger briefings: air operator certificate holder. 171. Passenger briefing: extended over water operations. 172. Passenger seat belts. 173. Passenger seat backs. 174. Stowage of food, beverage and passenger service 175. Securing of items of mass in passenger compartment Crew member and Flight Operations Officer Qualifications Commercial Air Transport Operation 176. Age restriction 177. Pilot-In-Command licence requirements: turbojet, turbofan or large aircraft 178. Pilot-In-Command licence requirements: non turbojet or turbofan small aircraft 179. Pilot-In-Command aeronautical experience: Small aircraft 180. Co-pilot licence requirements 181. Flight engineer licence requirements. 6 Regulation 182. 183. 184. 185. 186. 187. 188. 189. 190. 191. 192. 193. 194. 195. 196. 197. 198. 199. 200. 201. 202. 203. 204. 205. 206. 207. 208. 209. 210. 211. 212. 213. 214. 215. 216. 217. 218. 219. One pilot qualified to perform flight engineer functions Persons qualified in flight release. Company procedures indoctrination Initial dangerous goods training Security training programmes Initial emergency equipment drills Initial emergency equipment drills. Initial aircraft ground training: flight crew Initial aircraft ground training: cabin crew Competence checks: cabin crew members Initial training: flight operations officer. Initial flight training: flight crew member Initial specialised operations training. Aircraft differences training. Use of synthetic flight trainers. Aircraft and instrument proficiency checks. Introduction of new equipment or procedures. Pilot qualification: recent experience Pilot operating limitations and pairing requirements Flight engineer proficiency checks Competence checks: flight operations officer. Supervised line flying: pilots Supervised line flying: flight engineers. Supervised line experience: cabin crew. Line observations: flight operations officer. Route and area checks: pilot qualification Low minimum authorisation: Pilot-In-Command Designated special aerodromes and heliports: Pilot-In-Command qualification. Designated special airport qualifications aerodrome limitations Recurrent training and checking: flight crew members Recurrent training: cabin crew members Recurrent training: flight operations officers Check pilot training Authorised instructor or synthetic flight trainer and authorised instructor training Authorised instructor qualifications Check pilot and authorised flight engineer qualifications Check pilot designation. Check pilot authorizations and limitations 7 Regulation 220. 221. 222. 223. 224. 225. Synthetic flight trainer approval. Line qualification: check pilot and instructor. Termination of a proficiency, competence or line check. Recording of crew member qualifications. Monitoring of training and checking activities Eligibility period PART IX - FATIGUE OF CREW AND PROTECTION OF FLIGHT CREW FROM COSMIC RADIATION Fatigue of Crew 226. Application, interpretation and modification 227. Establishment of limits on flight times, flight duty periods and rest periods 228. Maximum flight duty periods for crew member 229. Minimum rest periods for crew members. 230. Duty and rest periods for flight operations officers 231. Records of flight times and duty periods 232. Maximum flight times for crew member 233. Provision for particular cases 234. Duties of operators to prevent excessive fatigue of crew members. Protection of Crew Member from Cosmic Radiation 235. Protection of crew member from cosmic radiation 236. Cosmic radiation: records to be kept PART X - FLIGHT RELEASE COMMERCIAL AIR TRANSPORT OPERATIONS 237. 238. 239. 240. 241. 242. 243. 244. 245. 246. 247. 248. 249. Qualified persons required for operational control functions. Functions associated with operational control. Operational control duties. Contents of a flight release. Flight release: aircraft requirements Flight release: facilities and NOTAMs Flight release: weather reports and forecasts Flight release in icing conditions Flight release under VFR or IFR Flight release: minimum fuel supply Flight release: aircraft loading and performance. Flight release: amendment or re-release en-route. Flight release: requirement for airborne weather radar equipment. 8 Regulation PART XI - EXEMPTIONS 250. Requirement for application. 251. Request for exemption Review, Publication and Issue or Denial of the Exemption 252. Initial review by the Authority 253. Evaluation of the request. 254. 255. 256. 257. 258. 259. 260. 261. 262. 263. 264. 265. 266. 267. PART XII - GENERAL PROVISIONS Possession of the licence Drug and alcohol testing and reporting Inspection of licences and certificates. Change of name Change of address Replacement of documents Certificate Suspension and Revocations Use and retention of certificates and records. Reports of violation. Enforcement of directions Aeronautical user fees Application of regulations to Government and visiting forces, etc Extra-territorial application of Regulations Flights over any foreign country PART XIII - OFFENCES AND PENALTIES 268. Contravention of Regulations. 269. Penalties. PART XIV – REPEAL AND SAVINGS 270. Revocation and savings. SCHEDULES First Schedule—Altimetry system performance requirement for operation in RVSM air Space Second Schedule—Penalties 9 S T A T U T O R Y I N S T R U M E N T S 2014 No. 64. The Civil Aviation ( Operation of Aircraft) Regulations, 2014. (Under sections 34(2) and 61 of the Civil Aviation Authority Act, Cap 354) IN EXERCISE of the powers conferred upon the Minister by sections 34(2) and 61 of the Civil Aviation Authority Act, Cap 354, and on the recommendation of the Civil Aviation Authority, these Regulations are made this 6th day of June, 2014. PART I—PRELIMINARY. 1. Title These Regulations may be cited as the Civil Aviation (Operation of Aircraft) Regulations, 2014. 2. Interpretation In these Regulations, unless the context otherwise requires— “advisory airspace” means an airspace of defined dimensions, or designated route, within which air traffic advisory service is available; “aerial work” means an aircraft operation in which an aircraft is used for specialised services including, but not limited to agriculture, construction, photography, surveying, observation and patrol, search and rescue and aerial advertisement; “aerodrome” means a defined area on land or water, including any buildings, installations and equipment, used or intended to be used either wholly or in part for the arrival, departure and surface movement of aircraft; 10 “aerodrome operating minima” means the limits of usability of an Aerodrome for— (a) (b) take-off, expressed in terms of runway visual range and visibility and, if necessary, cloud conditions; landing in precision approach and landing operations, expressed in terms of visibility and runway visual range and decision altitude or height (DA or DH) as appropriate to the category of the operation; (c) landing in approach and landing operations with vertical guidance, expressed in terms of visibility and runway visual range and decision altitude or height (DA or DH); and (d) landing in non-precision approach and landing operations, expressed in terms of visibility and runway visual range, minimum descent altitude or height (MDA or MDH) and, if necessary, cloud conditions; “aerodrome traffic zone” means an airspace of defined dimensions established around an aerodrome for the protection of aerodrome traffic; “aeronautical product” means any aircraft, aircraft engine, propeller, or subassembly, appliance, material, part, or component to be installed; “aeroplane” means a power-driven heavier-than-air aircraft, deriving its lift in flight chiefly from aerodynamic reactions on surfaces which remain fixed under given conditions of flight; “air traffic control service” means a service provided for the purpose of— (a) preventing collisions— (i) between aircraft; and (ii) on manoeuvring area between aircraft and obstructions; and 11 (b) expediting and maintaining an orderly flow of airtraffic; “air traffic control unit” is a generic term meaning variously an area control centre, approach control unit or aerodrome control tower; “air traffic service” is a generic term meaning variously flight information service, alerting service, air traffic advisory service, or air traffic control service; “aircraft” means any machine that can derive support in the atmosphere from the reactions of the air, other than the reactions of the air against the earth’s surface; “aircraft component” means any component part of an aircraft up to and including a complete power plant or any operational or emergency equipment; “aircraft type” means all aircraft of the same basic design; “airframe” means the fuselage, booms, nacelles, cowlings, fairings, airfoil surfaces, including rotors (but excluding propellers and rotating airfoils of a powerplant) and landing gear of an aircraft and their accessories and controls; “alternate aerodrome” means an aerodrome to which an aircraft may proceed when it becomes either impossible or inadvisable to proceed to or to land at the aerodrome of intended landing including the following— (a) take-off alternate- an alternate aerodrome at which an aircraft can land should this become necessary shortly after take-off and it is not possible to use the aerodrome of departure; (b) en-route alternate- an alternate aerodrome at which an aircraft would be able to land after experiencing an abnormal or emergency condition while en route; 12 (c) ETOPS en-route alternate- a suitable and appropriate alternate aerodrome at which an aeroplane would be able to land after experiencing an engine shutdown or other abnormal or emergency condition while en route in an ETOPS operation; and (d) destination alternate- an alternate aerodrome to which an aircraft may proceed should it become either impossible or inadvisable to land at the aerodrome of intended landing; “appliance” means any instrument, mechanism, equipment, part, apparatus, appurtenance, or accessory, including communications equipment, that is used or intended to be used in operating or controlling an aircraft in flight, is installed in or attached to the aircraft, and is not part of an airframe, power plant, or propeller; “approach and landing operations using instrument approach procedures” means instrument approach and landing operations classified as follows— (a) non-precision approach and landing operations- an instrument approach and landing which utilizes lateral guidance but does not utilize vertical guidance; (b) approach and landing operations with vertical guidance- an instrument approach and landing which utilizes lateral and vertical guidance but does not meet the requirements established for precision approach and landing operations; (c) precision approach and landing operations- an instrument approach and landing using precision lateral and vertical guidance with minima as determined by the category of operation; 13 “appropriate authority” means— (a) regarding flight over the high seas-the relevant authority of the state of registry; (b) regarding flight other than over the high seas-the relevant authority of the state having sovereignty over the territory being overflown. “authorised instructor” means a person who— (a) holds a valid ground instructor licence issued under the Civil Aviation (Personnel Licensing) Regulations, 2014 when conducting ground training; (b) holds a ...
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