Ch_05 Lecture - Key Questions: What were the British...

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Key Questions: What were the British problems and policies in North America after the French and Indian War? What were the conflicts between Native Americans and the colonists? What was the American reaction to British attempts to tax the colonies? What characterized the social tensions and the Regulator movements in the Carolinas? What characterized intercolonial union and resistance to British measures?
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Imperial reorganization British problems In 1763, the British faced potential threats from France’s desire for revenge and the possibility of disloyalty from French inhabitants in newly acquired territories. Spain strengthened its colonial rule by adopting a more efficient system of administration based on the French model and expanding its military presence. The British resented colonial actions during the war including the failure of some colonies to enlist their quota of troops and illegal trade with French West Indies. The huge war debt led British officials to consider having Americans pay more for running the empire.
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Imperial reorganization, cont’d. Dealing with the new territories Britain maintained substantial troops in the American colonies and passed the Proclamation of 1763 to restrict white settlement. The presence of troops alarmed Americans and they resented the curbs on expanded settlement. Map: Colonial Settlement and the Proclamation of 1763, p.126
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Imperial reorganization, cont’d. Indian affairs The removal of France had diminished their importance as they were no longer needed as allies and they could not play European powers against each other. The Cherokee War and Pontiac’s rebellion tested British policy toward Native Americans. The costly wars led to increased control of administration of Indian affairs and the Proclamation of 1763. Neither of these policies were totally successful.
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Imperial reorganization, cont’d. Curbing the assemblies In the 1750s, a dispute over the pay of clergy in Virginia, the Parson’s Cause, led to the British crown attempting to enforce a veto power over some colonial legislation, raising colonial protests. British authorities tried to restrict the power of colonial
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Ch_05 Lecture - Key Questions: What were the British...

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