Ch_06 Lecture - Key Questions: Why did tensions mount with...

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Key Questions: Why did tensions mount with Britain? How and why was independence declared? What were the contending forces in the war for independence? What were the major campaigns of the Revolution? What characterized the alliance with France? What characterized the peace settlement? What were the social effects of the war?
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The Outbreak of War and the Declaration of Independence, 1774–1776 Mounting tensions In May 1774, General Gage replaced Thomas Hutchinson as governor of Massachusetts and dissolved the Massachusetts legislature which met anyway as a Provincial Congress. The Provincial Congress formed a Committee of Safety and many local communities had formed militia. The Loyalists’ Dilemma The Loyalists comprised about 20 percent of the colonial population and came from all walks of life and social classes.
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The Outbreak of War and the Declaration of Independence, 1774–1776, cont’d. British coercion and conciliation Lord North proposed a Conciliatory Proposition that replaced taxes with voluntary colonial contributions in an amount decided by the British. The Battles of Lexington and Concord Under orders to arrest rebel leaders and destroy military supplies at Concord, the British army marched toward Lexington and Concord. At both towns, violence erupted. At Concord, the colonial militia hounded the British forces back to Boston. Map: The Battles of Lexington and Concord, p.151.
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The Outbreak of War and the Declaration of Independence, 1774–1776, cont’d. The Second Continental Congress, 1775–1776 The Second Continental Congress convened in Philadelphia on May 10, 1775. It organized the Continental Army, authorized commission of a navy, established a post office, and authorized the printing of paper currency. Congress sent the Olive Branch petition to King George III asking protection from Parliament but also approved the Declaration of the Causes and Necessity of Taking Up Arms.
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The Outbreak of War and the Declaration of Independence, 1774–1776, cont’d. Commander in Chief George Washington John Adams nominated George Washington to head the Continental Army to help make the quarrel with Britain a unifying conflict.
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Independence, 1774–1776, cont’d. Early fighting: Massachusetts, Virginia, the Carolinas, and Canada After months of standoff, Washington brought heavy cannons to bear on Boston and the British evacuated the city. In the Carolinas, a patriot force defeated the British at Moore’s Creek Bridge and the patriots repulsed a British attack on Charleston. In Canada, one patriot army captured Montreal but a
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This note was uploaded on 10/13/2010 for the course HIST 2301 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at Lone Star College System.

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Ch_06 Lecture - Key Questions: Why did tensions mount with...

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