Econ_103_Syllabus_Fall_2010

Econ_103_Syllabus_Fall_2010 - Econ 103 UCLA, Fall 2010...

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Unformatted text preview: Econ 103 UCLA, Fall 2010 Introduction to Econometrics Instructor: Sarolta Laczo Email: slaczo@econ.ucla.edu Office, office hours: Bunche Hall 8369, Wednesday 10.00 - 11.45 am Class time, place: Tuesday and Thursday 9.30 - 10.45 am, Moore Hall 100 Teaching assistants: Email Office Office hours Matthew Baird matthewbaird@ucla.edu Anthony Keats akeats@ucla.edu Joseph Kuehn jkuehn@ucla.edu Dmitry Plotnikov dplotnikov@ucla.edu Diego Ubfal dubfal@ucla.edu Office hours TBA. Prerequisites: Econ 11, and either Econ 41 or Statistics 11 or 100A Econ 103 is an impacted course. Hence, if you are going to drop the course, you must do so by Friday, October 8. Course description: This course is an introduction to Econometrics, which uses economic theory and statistical techniques to analyze economic data. The aim of the course is for you to learn to approach quantitative questions such as: How much a college degree increases wages? If the price of a product decreases, how much will its demand increase? What is the effect of taxes on cigarettes on smoking? Do more policemen reduce crime? You will learn some basic techniques in order to try to answer such questions, as well as the conditions under which these techniques are appropriate. Econometrics is used in many fields where you may imagine making a career, including academic research, consulting, finance, investment banking, law, public health, social work, marketing, and development. The main topic of the course is the regression model, which allows us to use data to estimate the effect of changing one variable on another variable. The course will start with the basic univariate regression model, and then move to more complex scenarios: multivariate regression, non-linear regression, regression with panel data, and binary dependent variables.regression, non-linear regression, regression with panel data, and binary dependent variables....
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This note was uploaded on 10/13/2010 for the course ECON 103 taught by Professor Sandrablack during the Spring '07 term at UCLA.

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Econ_103_Syllabus_Fall_2010 - Econ 103 UCLA, Fall 2010...

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