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Clinical Field Experience A: Literacy Assessment and Framework _________________________________ ELM-580-0501 Grand Canyon University
Clinical Field Experience A: Literacy Assessment and Framework Implementing regular literacy assessment and having a strong literacy framework aids in teacher’s abilities to better differentiate to their students’ literacy needs. In fact, literacy assessment should be a fluid part of literacy instruction—built into the framework that instruction is built upon. Through my interview experience and observation with Mrs. Megan Linacre, a First Grade Teacher at Riverview Charter School, I learned that assessment and framework choices are greatly influenced by students, teachers, and school beliefs. This paper overviews and reflects upon literacy assessment and framework that I gathered through my time spent observing and interviewing Mrs. Linacre. Part One: Observation and Collaboration Lesson Observation I began by observing Mrs. Linacre carry out a Fountas and Pinnell literacy assessment on a student enrolling into first grade. The students observed were new to the Charter School and were being assessed to best ensure the classes are balanced for the 2019-2020 school year. I think this is magnificent, for it allows teachers the ability to go into the school year with assessments on all of their students. The up-in-coming Kindergarteners’ previous assessment records will be passed along to their new teachers as well. This will ensure that the First Grade Team has baseline assessment on every child. The assessment began with Mrs. Linacre introducing the title of the book and Author’s name. Then she passed the book along to the student. As the student read, Mrs. Linacre tracked how many words the student missed by marking them on a record sheet. At the end of the reading, Mrs. Linacre asked a series of comprehension questions that were provided. She tracked
if the student could answer each question with detail. After the record was complete, Mrs. Linacre used a rubric scale to judge the accuracy of the student’s reading. If the student scored 95% or above on accuracy and demonstrated quality comprehension, she moved the child up to the next reading level to preform the same task. If the child scored to low in comprehension or too low in accuracy, that reading level was deemed the student’s instructional reading level. I observed a total of three students get assessed. Interview 1. Which literacy assessments have proved to be successful in identifying student needs? How were these assessments chosen?

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