TEST2%20Chap06-08UPDATED - TEST 2 UPDATED Ant2511Fall 2010...

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TEST 2 UPDATED Ant2511Fall 2010 Chap 06 Overview of Living Primates Primates 1. Introduction A mammalian order 2. Primate Characteristics A) Limbs and Locomotion Prehensile or grasping ability. C) Senses and the Brain Eyes positioned forward on the front of the face Decreased reliance on sense of smell 3. Primate Adaptations (explanations ) 3.A Evolutionary Factors Explaining Characteristics 1) Arboreal Hypothesis Traditional explanation Adaptation to tree living 2) Visual Predation Hypothesis Forward facing eyes for grabbing insects 1
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3) Flower Plants Rise of flowering plants influenced primate evolution Dental Formula Old World Anthropoids and New World monkeys different 3.D Locomotion 1)Quadrupedal Most primates “quadrupedal” Majority arboreal Many prosimians and tarisers Cling vertically Spring away from trunk 3) Brachiation Brachiating (arm swinging) Gibbons and siamangs especially 4) “Prehensile tails” Only among New World monkeys 4. Primate Classification 2
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Primate Taxonomy Categories illustrate evolutionary relationships Traditionally based on physical similarities Primate classification changing because of genetic evidence Revised Classifications: Note some primatologists in recent years suggest grouping all great apes and humans in same family Primate Classification Primate Taxonomy Primates are categorized in subgroups 1) Strepsirhini (lemurs and lorises) 2) Haplorhini (tarsiers, monkeys, apes and humans). A Survey of the Living Primates Primate Suborders Primates (order) Divided as follows: Two major divisions (suborders) 1) Strepsirhini (strep-sir-in-ee) 2) Haplorhini (hap-lo-rin-ee) Lemurs and Lorises (strepsirhini) Primitive primates 3
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Known as “prosimians” Lemurs Madagascar (Island off the coast of Africa) Lorises Islands of southeast Asia. Anthropoids Anthropoids (Monkeys, Apes, and Humans) Monkeys, Apes and Humans Anthropoids Two divisions of Anthropoids 1) New World monkeys 2) Old World primates (Old World Monkeys, Apes, Humans) New World monkeys – platyrrhini nostrils—has to do with the nose Old World anthropoids - catarrhini nostrils Monkeys New World Monkeys Arboreal (trees) Some use prehensile tails Old World Monkeys and other Old World Primates 4
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Old World Monkeys Most widely distributed primate Africa, Asia, Japan Hominoids (Traditionally Apes and Humans) Apes Found in Asia and Africa Includes Lesser Apes and Great Apes 1) “Lesser Apes ”--smaller Gibbons Siamangs Gibbons and Siamangs Smallest apes Tropical areas of southeast Asia. Brachiation (arm swinging)
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This note was uploaded on 10/13/2010 for the course ANTHRO 60000 taught by Professor Douglas during the Fall '10 term at University of Central Oklahoma.

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TEST2%20Chap06-08UPDATED - TEST 2 UPDATED Ant2511Fall 2010...

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