4125 Sensory Physiology 2010WebCT

4125 Sensory Physiology 2010WebCT - Sensory Physiology see...

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Sensory Physiology – see Chapter 11 We have discussed the anatomy/function of the brain and spinal cord, Now look at perception of sensory information . 1a.General properties of Sensory Receptors : a. Somatic senses (touch-pressure, temperature, pain, proprioception) b. Special senses ( vision, hearing, equilibrium; taste, olfaction -lab ) 3. Specific Neural pathways in the sensory system: c. General properties of Sensory Pathways b. Definition of Sensory Pathway : 2. Sensory Coding and the generation and propagation of electrical/chemical signals
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How do we detect sensory information? 1a. Sensory Receptors : specialized neuronal structures that detect specific types of energy The energy form of a stimulus is called its modality The law of specific nerve energies states: Sensory receptors are specific for a particular modality. Specific modality to which receptor is most sensitive - adequate stimulus. Visceral receptors detect stimuli that arise with the body Somatosensory receptors detect sensations associated with receptors in the skin, and proprioception In order to detect information, there must be a stimulus
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Some examples Receptor class Modality Photoreceptor Vision Baroreceptors Blood Pressure Sensation/ visceral info see Table 11.2 for more examples Note: If the strength of an “inadequate stimulus” is high enough, the receptor will respond. Example?
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There are different groups of receptors: - chemo receptors : smell, taste, blood concentration of O 2 and CO 2, - mechano receptors : pressure, stretch eg. baroreceptor - photo receptors : light wavelengths - thermo receptors : sensations of coldness and warmth - but also noci ceptors : tissue damage interpreted as pain: stimulated by intense mechanical, thermal or chemical stimuli
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Have neural receptors (free nerve endings) and non-neural receptor
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Fig 11.2 How do sensory receptors work? - convert the energy of the stimulus into changes in membrane potential: The stimulus energy must be transduced and processed by the CNS Remember : To cause direct/indirect change in membrane potential must open/close ion channels (see notes on generation of Graded Potentials and Action Potentials) - results in generator potentials or receptor potentials (in non-neural cells)
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Signal Duration : - in general, the longer the stimulus lasts, the more APs will be generated However – sensory receptors react differently to continuous stimulation: Tonic receptors adapt slowly , transmit signals to the CNS as long as the stimulus persists. -
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This note was uploaded on 10/14/2010 for the course ZOO 4125 taught by Professor Flanigan during the Fall '10 term at Univeristy of Wyoming- Laramie.

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4125 Sensory Physiology 2010WebCT - Sensory Physiology see...

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