{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Hearing and Equilibrium 2009 - Special Senses The Ear and...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–6. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Special Senses: The Ear and The Eye 1.The anatomy of the ear 2. Sound transmission through the ear 3. Signal transduction in the cochlear duct 4. The Vestibular System
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Special Senses The ear is the sense organ for two special senses: hearing and equilibrium . Hearing is our perception of the energy of sound waves . 1. Sound is the interpretation of the frequency, amplitude and duration of the wave High frequency waves give rise to high pitched sounds (Hz); We can hear in the range 20-20,000 Hz; hear best between 1000-3000Hz 2. Loudness is a function of intensity Sound intensity is a function of wave amplitude (decibels (dB)). An increase of 10dB corresponds to a 10-fold increase in intensity Normal conversation: 60dB; begin to damage at 80dB; concert 120dB (also influenced by individual ear sensitivity – see structure of ear )
Image of page 2
See Fig. 11.36
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1. Sound waves strike tympanic membrane and cause vibration 2. Energy is transferred to the 3 bones of the middle ear, which vibrate 3. Stapes is attached to oval window; vibration of oval window causes fluid waves in the cochlea 4. Fluid waves push on membranes of cochlear duct 5.Energy is transmitted across the cochlear duct, into the tympanic duct, and dissipates back to the middle ear via the round window 6. Hair cells in the cochlear duct create action potentials in the sensory neurons of the nerve Basilar membrane High K + ions helicotrema Vestibular membrane
Image of page 4
See Fig 11.39 How exactly does a sound wave cause firing of sensory neurons?
Image of page 5

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 6
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern