Social & Emotional Development in Infancy and Early

Social & Emotional Development in Infancy and Early...

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Social & Emotional Development in Infancy and Early Childhood Attachment, Morality & Play
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Autonomy vs. Attachment Multiple theories in psychology try to contend with the fact that, throughout development, people are motivated by autonomy / independence needs as well as by attachment / belongingness needs
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Evidence for Attachment Needs Infants come to prefer the sight, smell, and sound of their own mothers Infants are significantly more likely to show positive affect and attentive interest in the presence known caregivers vs. strangers. Harlow’s Monkeys Reared monkeys with a Wire vs. a Cloth surrogate Found that monkeys spent more time clinging to the cloth monkey and were more likely to run to it when frightened, regardless of whether or not the cloth monkey or the wire monkey gave milk Why is Attachment evolutionarily Advantageous?
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3 Types of Attachment Secure Attachment Avoidant Attachment Anxious Attachment Assessed by the Strange Situation Test
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3 Types of Attachment Secure Attachment In the Strange Situation Test, securely attached infants Explore when their mother is present • Show signs of distress and explore less when their mother is absent • Show pleasure when the mother returns Infants become securely attached to a mother who Provides regular contact comfort • Responds promptly and sensitively to distress signals • Provides Interactional Synchrony “the degree to which the mother and child are in the same behavioral and affective state at the same time with respect to the occurrence and intensity” (Klimenko & Hsu, 2006) Secure attachment leads to:
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This note was uploaded on 10/15/2010 for the course PSYCH PSYCH1 taught by Professor Johnson during the Fall '09 term at CUNY Brooklyn.

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Social & Emotional Development in Infancy and Early...

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