Lecture8_revised

Lecture8_revised - Psychology 110 Biological Psychology...

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Psychology 110: Biological Psychology Lecture 8: General principles of sensory systems
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Recap of course so far we have so far looked at the basic anatomical and functional properties of the nervous system. we have also looked at how flexible it is during development, learning and in response to injury. over the next few lectures we will turn our attention to how it processes information, in particular, how it processes environmental stimuli and determines the appropriate motor response to those stimuli.
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Outline of Lecture 8 We will begin by looking at some of the features of sensory processing that are common to all sensory systems: how energy from sensory stimuli gets converted into electrical energy and action potentials (sensory transduction) how the nervous system codes information, such as the identity and location of the stimulus some general properties of sensory neurons, such as adaptation and receptive fields cognitive influences on sensory perception, such as attention and multimodal integration
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Sensory receptor organs detect energy or substances Across the animal kingdom there are a large variety of sensory receptors (e.g. infrared detectors, electromagnetic field detectors). The most relevant to vertebrates are:
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Muller Muller’s doctrine of specific nerve energies 1. Sensation was awareness of the states of the sensory nerves not of the outer world itself radical departure from the Greek philosophers who had argued that images from objects in the world enter the eye and travel to the brain.
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Muller Muller’s doctrine of specific nerve energies 1. Sensation was awareness of the states of the sensory nerves not of the outer world itself radical departure from the Greek philosophers who had argued that images from objects in the world enter the eye and travel to the brain. 2. When a given nerve type was excited, the same type of experience is produced no matter what the stimulus photic, mechanical and electrical stimulation of the eye produce visual sensations.
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Muller Muller’s doctrine of specific nerve energies 3. Same physical stimulus applied to different sense organs give rise to different sensations blow to the eye and one to the ear produce visual and auditory sensations respectively.
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Muller’s doctrine of specific nerve energies 1. Sensation was awareness of the states of the sensory nerves not of the outer world itself 2. When a given nerve type was excited, the same type of experience is produced no matter what the stimulus 3. Same physical stimulus applied to different sense organs give rise to different sensations Even though this is true, we define an ‘adequate stimulus’ as the type of stimulus for which a given sensory organ is particularly adapted.
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This note was uploaded on 10/16/2010 for the course PSYCH 110 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at Berkeley.

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Lecture8_revised - Psychology 110 Biological Psychology...

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