Lecture10_revised

Lecture10_revised - Psychology 110: Biological Psychology...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–12. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Psychology 110: Biological Psychology Lecture 10: Hearing and the vestibular system Recap of Lecture 9 • we saw how four different types of peripheral receptor in the skin mediate the perception of touch. • finally, we finished by looking at the main sensory pathways for temperature and pain, and saw how they consisted of both ascending and descending components. • we saw how touch is represented in somatosensory cortex, with an overrepresentation of the lips, hands and feet, giving rise to the somatosensory homunculus. • we saw how touch information is represented in higher cortical areas, where the emphasis is on maintaining the information in memory and manipulating the information. Outline of Lecture 10 • we will look at the anatomy and functional properties of the ear, and how it permits auditory perception. • we will look at the vestibular system and learn how it allows us to maintain accurate balance, and compensate for changes in head and body position. Importance of hearing elen Keller “Blindness deprives you of contact with things; deafness deprives you of contact with people.” • sound has a wide range of complexity, enabling human language. • unlike visual stimuli it can go round obstacles, and it works as well in the dark as in the light. The stimulus The amplitude is experienced as loudness . The frequency is experienced as pitch . itch is measured in Hz Frequency of sound (Hz) Human speech discrimination depends on tones in the range from 1000 – 5000 Hz, which is also the frequency of sound to which we are most sensitive. The anatomy of the ear The pinna (external ear) is designed to amplify certain sound frequencies and muffle others. In humans, sounds in the range 1000 – 5000 Hz are amplified. MIDDLE EAR The middle ear The middle ear consists of three small bones (ossicles) called the malleus (hammer), incus (anvil) and the stapes (stirrup). Act as an amplifier helping small mechanical forces of air molecules to move the fluid in the inner ear, by focusing the pressures from the large tympanic membrane on the small oval window. Sensitivity of system can be altered by contracting muscles. For example, these muscles contract when we hear a loud sound (preventing damage to the inner ear) and just before we swallow (so that we aren’t distracted by our own internally generated noises). The anatomy of the ear COCHLEA The cochlea The cochlea consists of a coil of three parallel canals, the vestibular canal, the middle canal and the tympanic canal . The whole structure is only 4 mm in diameter, but if unrolled would extend to about 40 mm. The cochlea unrolled ibration of the oval window causes a wave to pass through the fluid in the estibular canal, and back down the tympanic canal....
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 10/16/2010 for the course PSYCH 110 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at Berkeley.

Page1 / 37

Lecture10_revised - Psychology 110: Biological Psychology...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 12. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online