CA Water Myths - California Water Myths Ellen Hanak Jay...

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www.ppic.org California Water Myths Ellen Hanak Jay Lund Ariel Dinar Brian Gray Richard Howitt Jeffrey Mount Peter Moyle Barton “Buzz” Thompson with research support from Josue Medellin-Azuara, Davin Reed, Elizabeth Stryjewski, and Robyn Suddeth Supported with funding from S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, The David and Lucile Packard Foundation, Pisces Foundation, Resources Legacy Fund, and Santa Ana Watershed Project Authority SUMMARY C alifornia has a complex, highly interconnected, and decentralized water system. Although local operations draw on considerable expertise and analysis, broad public policy and planning discussions about water often involve a variety of misperceptions—or myths— about how the system works and the options available for improving its performance. The prevalence of myth and folklore makes for lively rhetoric but hinders the develop- ment of eFective policy and raises environmental and economic costs. Moving beyond myth toward a water policy based on facts and science is essential if California is to meet the multi-
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This note was uploaded on 10/16/2010 for the course ESPM C12 taught by Professor Garrisonsposito during the Spring '10 term at University of California, Berkeley.

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CA Water Myths - California Water Myths Ellen Hanak Jay...

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