Enteral_NutritionBWF_10.pptx

Enteral_NutritionBWF_10.pptx - Malnutrition Weight...

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10/18/10 Malnutrition Weight abnormalities, low visceral protein 30 – 50% of hospitalized patients 95% of nursing home patients Resulting in reduced quality of life Delayed recovery increased health care costs May be remedied by providing nutrition support Oral diets Supplemental foods Specialized nutrition support Enteral feeding
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10/18/10 Hospital Diets “House” or regular diet Therapeutic diets Accommodate changes in digestion, absorption, or organ function Provide nutrition therapy through nutrient content changes Caloric level Consistency Single nutrient manipulation Preparation Food restriction Number, size, frequency of meals Addition of supplements Texture modifications
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10/18/10 Increasing Intake or Oral Supplements Increase nutrient density without increasing volume Snacks Liquid meal replacement formulas Modular products Commercial supplements Appetite Stimulants-Drugs that stimulate appetite Prednisone Megestrol acetate
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10/18/10 Specialized Nutrition Support (SNS) Administration of nutrients with therapeutic intent Enteral Parenteral Dietitian’s responsibilities Assess the patient Make decisions on the Formula rate that meets the patient’s energy, protein, and fluid needs Follow the patient Ethical considerations keeping patients npo withholding nutrition support in terminal patients
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10/18/10 Delivery of formulated enteral or parenteral nutrients to maintain or restore nutritional status Enteral nutrition provision of nutrients into GI tract through tube or catheter when oral intake is inadequate may include formulas as oral supplements or meal replacements Parenteral nutrition provision of nutrients intravenously
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10/18/10 Rationale and Criteria Maintain or restore optimum nutritional status in severely ill patients Enteral nutrition Small bowel motility returns before gastric or colonic motility ; allows early enteral feeding Don’t feed a pt unless bowel sounds are present. Parenteral nutrition Reserved for nonfunctional or severely diminished small bowel
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10/18/10 Enteral Feeding Advantages Cost effective Maintenance of GI fuction , especially barrier function Preserved gastrointestinal immunity Preserved gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) activity Reduced infectious complications Disadvantages Difficulty of administration Poor tolerance Difficult to meet nutritional needs of some patients Could increase mortality If the gut works, use it!
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10/18/10 Maintenance of GI Function with Enteral Feeding Stimulates the biliary/pancreatic axis helping small bowel function Stimulates blood flow from the spleen, neuronal activity, IgA antibody release, and secretion of GI hormones, such as epidermal growth factor which stimulate gut
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This note was uploaded on 10/17/2010 for the course HUEC 4011 taught by Professor ? during the Spring '10 term at LSU.

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Enteral_NutritionBWF_10.pptx - Malnutrition Weight...

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