Chapter 1 (Santrock) - Chapter 1: Introduction The...

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Chapter 1: Introduction The Historical Perspective o Early History § Greece (4th Century B.C.) Plato o children: music and sports o adolescents: science and mathematics o reasoning starts in adolescence Aristotle o the ability to choose o development of self-determination § Rousseau's view in the 18th century a more enlightened view Curiosity should be encouraged in the education (12-15 years of age) emotional maturity (15-20 years of age) o An interest in others replaces selfishness Development has distinct phases o The Twentieth Century and Twenty-First Centuries § G. Stanley Hall's Storm and Stress View development o controlled by genetically determined physiological factors o environment is minimal adolescence o 12-23 years of age o a turbulent time charged with conflict and mood swings o characterized by considerable upheaval § Margaret Mead's Sociocultural View of Adolescence not biological, but sociocultural Samoan adolescents are relatively free of turmoil o allowed sexual relations, natural view of birth and death o clear definition of adult roles promoted a stress-free adolescence criticized for her bias and error § The Inventionist View
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Adolescence is a sociohistorical creation the "age of adolescence" (1890-1920) o legislation ensured the dependency of youth and made their move into the economic sphere more manageable o exclusion of youth in employment o requirement of secondary education § employment in ages 10-15 dropped 75% from 1910-1930 § high school graduation increased 600 from 1900-1930 § Further Changes in the Twentieth Century and the Twenty-First Century women's movement dual family and career objectives increased use of media and technology by adolescents increased diversity o Stereotyping of Adolescence § stereotype A generalization that reflects our impressions and beliefs about a broad group of people All stereotypes refer to an image of what the typical member of a particular group is like. o Adolescents portrayed as abnormal and deviant in the media § adolescent generalization gap concept of generalizations about adolescents based on information about a limited, highly visible group of adolescents o A Positive View of Adolescence § Old Centuries and New Centuries § old: too negative § new: focus on positive human experience § Generational Perceptions and Misperceptions § Perceptions § from personal experience and media portrays § neither is objective § hostile attitude from parental and societal standards § Adolescents are. ..
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§ lazy, don't want to work, promiscuous, into drugs, spoiled, etc. Today's Adolescents in the United States and around the World o Adolescents in the United States § Social Contexts contexts o The settings in which development occurs. o
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This note was uploaded on 10/17/2010 for the course PSYC 207 taught by Professor Michelecarter during the Fall '09 term at Tompkins Cortland Community College.

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Chapter 1 (Santrock) - Chapter 1: Introduction The...

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