Bias, Rhetoric, Argumentation Assignment

Bias, Rhetoric, Argumentation Assignment - Bias, Rhetorical...

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Bias, Rhetorical Devices, and Argumentation This excerpt from Citizen Kane contains examples of bias, rhetoric, and fallacies. Though interesting and most definitely suave, the speech given by Kane ends up playing host to yet another set of tools in the political arsenal. In the beginning passage there is a clear example of bias being used. The Campaigner refers to Gettys as the “evil dominator” while pinning the proverbial “badge of honor” on Kane. His comments are based on personal belief, not fact. This bias is political in nature and gets the ball rolling for the remainder of the speech. Now, (in similar fashion) comes Kane. He makes use of one of the most notable fallacies (ad hominen). A prime example of where Kane used this can be observed at the beginning of his speech (“…the downright villainy, of Boss Jim W. Gettys' political machine…”). Score one for team Kane! An interesting occurrence that I will bring to your attention is the use of a scapegoat. This
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Bias, Rhetoric, Argumentation Assignment - Bias, Rhetorical...

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