BIEB 132 - BIEB 132 19:29 Lecture 1 Much of ocean is...

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Unformatted text preview: BIEB 132 19:29 Lecture 1 Much of ocean is foreign Average depth: 3800 meters Max dephth: 11000 meters -6.8 miles Mostly dark (below 200 meters) and cold (2 degress Celsius) High pressure (1atm/10 meters) Unlike terrestrial systems, most primary production in the sea is due to microbial activity. Some of the dominant primary prodcuers in the ocean have only been discovered in the past 30 years. New findings suggest that a swimmer swallowing a mouthful of sea water may be consuimg 1000 TYPES of bacteria. The lesser the weight of the organism, the more global biomass it has on the world. Ex. Whale is 10 million tons carbon, but a krill (shrimp) is 1000 million tons of carbon. ` Traditional view of energy flow in marine food webs Small fish eaten by big fish Current understanding A lot of phytoplankton is recycled through bacteria and never reaches the fish. Many marine organisms have only been collected a handful of times ( or never) and a great many have never been observed alive in their natural habitats. Worlds largest invertebrates: Architeuthis dux (giant squid)- 59 feet long, 1 ton Mesonychoteuthis hamiltoni ( colossal squid). Behaviorif we cant find them, we rarely know how they make their living. Open ocean is about 70% Earths surface However, open ocean not very productive (like desert) per unit area. Tropical rainforest has the most productivity per unit area. Despite being a desert, the open ocean ccounts for almost 25% of global productivity General Habitats of marine organisms Neuston-surface water, floating, Nekton-span through the water column, fish Plankton- small enough that they are drifting, can move around a little bit, but mostly drifting with the ocean Benthos- bottom feaders, living on the bottom Sandy/mudding areas-infaunal-burrowed in Boring-bore into wood/rock Epifaunal-on surface of bottom Cross section on the ocean Oceanic (Pelagic) Mesopelagic 200-1000m Bathypelagic1000-4000m Abyssopelagic 4000-6000 Hadal 9000 Seawater temperature as a function of depth Surface layer Thermocline layer (steady decrease) Deep water Bottom water 5 threats to marine biodiversity fisheries operations chemical pollution and eutrophication alteration of physical habitat invasion of exotic species global climate change Lecture 2 Chapter 4 Adaptations of marine organisms to changes in temperature and salinity o As terrestrial organisms, we are used to rapid changes in temperature and humidity o Such changes are not characterisctic of aquatic habitats, especially in the...
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This note was uploaded on 10/18/2010 for the course BIOLGY BIEB 132 taught by Professor Burton during the Fall '10 term at UCSD.

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BIEB 132 - BIEB 132 19:29 Lecture 1 Much of ocean is...

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