lab4 Acetylcholinesterase MOTM

lab4 Acetylcholinesterase MOTM - June 2004:...

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June 2004: Acetylcholinesterase Every time you move a muscle and every time you think a thought, your nerve cells are hard at work. They are processing information: receiving signals, deciding what to do with them, and dispatching new messages off to their neighbors. Some nerve cells communicate directly with muscle cells, sending them the signal to contract. Other nerve cells are involved solely in the bureaucracy of information, spending their lives communicating only with other nerve cells. But unlike our human bureaucracies, this processing of information must be fast in order to keep up with the ever- changing demands of life. Neurotransmitters Nerves communicate with one another and with muscle cells by using neurotransmitters. These are small molecules that are released from the nerve cell and rapidly diffuse to neighboring cells, stimulating a response once they arrive. Many different neurotransmitters are used for different jobs: glutamate excites nerves into action; GABA inhibits the passing of information; dopamine and serotonin are involved in the subtle messages of thought and cognition. The main job of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine is to carry the signal from nerve cells to muscle cells. When a motor nerve cell gets the proper signal from the nervous
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This note was uploaded on 10/18/2010 for the course BIO 204 taught by Professor O'neal during the Fall '07 term at SUNY Stony Brook.

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lab4 Acetylcholinesterase MOTM - June 2004:...

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